Pennsylvania Highways
PA 51 - PA 100

PA 51 Southern Terminus: Business US 40 in Uniontown
Northern Terminus: Ohio state line four miles north of Darlington
Length: 83 miles
National Highway System: US 119 to I-79
PA 68 to I-376
Names: Morgantown Street, Pittsburgh Street, Pittsburgh Road, Fuller Drive, Hayden Boulevard, Clairton Boulevard, Saw Mill Run Boulevard, West Carson Street, Stanhope Street, Chartiers Avenue, Island Avenue, Robinson Boulevard, Fleming Park Road, Coraopolis Boulevard, State Avenue, Fourth Avenue, Stoops Ferry Road, McGovern Road, South Jordan Street, North Jordan Street, Constitution Boulevard, Beaver Avenue, Pennsylvania Avenue, Ohio River Boulevard, and State Street
SR Designations: 0051
0019:  I-376/US 22/US 30 to PA 837
Counties: Fayette, Westmoreland, Allegheny, and Beaver 
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes:
Truck US 19:  West Liberty Avenue to I-376/US 22/US 30
US 19:  I-376/US 22/US 30 to PA 837
PA 65:  East Rochester to Rochester
PA 68:  Rochester to Beaver
Former Designation: PA 930  (1936 - 1946):  Stoops Ferry to Monaca
BicyclePA Route A BicyclePA Route: Coraopolis to Monaca
Blue Belt Belt System: Maytide Street to PA 88
Chartiers Street to the McKees Rocks Bridge
Orange Belt Belt System: Sewickley Bridge to Narrows Run Road
Yellow Belt Belt System: Neville Island Bridge/Ferree Street to Forest Grove Road
PennDOT
Traffic Cameras:
Liberty Tunnel Interchange
Crane Avenue
Wabash Street
Lowe Street
Alexander Street
South Main Street
History: Signed in 1927 from the Ohio state line to Pittsburgh and extended to Uniontown the following year.  Another section of PA 51 from McConnellsburg to Gettysburg was also signed in 1927.  It was signed on what is currently PA 16 and PA 116, but was decommissioned in 1928.

In 1928, the route was under construction from Laurel Hill Road to Flatwoods Road and Nichols Hill Road to current PA 201 and completed the following year.  In 1929, the route was moved from Montour Street, Ewings Mill Road, Forest Grove Road, Pine Hollow Road, and Broadway between Coraopolis and McKees Rocks to the current alignment.  On May 13, 1929, Allegheny County Commissioner Joseph G. Armstrong officiated the ceremony which officially kicked off work on Saw Mill Run Boulevard.  Commissioner E. V. Babcock, Pittsburgh Mayor Charlres H. Kline, Council President James F. Malone, Councilman John S. Herron, and Henry Meuschke, a Castle Shannon resident who advocated for the project as far back as 1910, were in attendance for the ground breaking.  The project was funded by the 1928 "City Beautiful" bond issue, which was to finance other roadways such as Ohio River, Allegheny River, and Mosside boulevards.

In 1930, the route was paved from current PA 201 to current PA 136.  Also that year, the first section of Saw Mill Run Boulevard opened from Brownsville Road to the Liberty Tunnel.  The most challenging part of construction was the PA 88 intersection where seven individual roads intersected as well as the convergence of Clairton Run Creek and Saw Mill Run.  The designation was moved off Brownsville Road and Arlington Avenue onto the new highway and through the tunnel to the P. J. McArdle Roadway to keep the route complete.  In 1933, the rest of it to Woodville Street opened and the designation placed on the new boulevard.  In 1934, the section from Desiderio Boulevard to West Elizabeth was under construction and opened the following year.

In 1946, the route was moved off Taggart Road in Beaver County.  In 1949, construction began on a bypass west of Perryopolis from Star Junction to Wickhaven, and was widened from PA 201 to Star Junction.  The bypass opened in 1950.

Construction on the West End Bypass began in October 1949; however, it had its start a decade earlier.  Robert Moses, New York City planner extraordinaire, had been hired by Pittsburgh to untangle traffic as well as he had done in "The Big Apple."  This was one of his ideas and priced at $900,000 which was approved in February 1941.  The onset of World War II delayed the project, and by the time it was revised, the cost had jumped to $3 million.  It took nearly a year to blast and remove one million cubic yards of material needed to clear its right-of-way on the side of Mount Washington.  Outside of that, another challenge Harrison Construction Company faced was building a ramp from Steuben Street.

In 1951, the West End Bypass opened to traffic from the Penn-Lincoln Parkway to PA 837.  However, the PA 51 designation still followed Woodville Street and Wabash Street to the West End Circle until 1955.  In 1953, the designation was moved out of Darlington onto a new alignment south of town.

Work to widen and install a median began in Wickhaven and at PA 201 in 1958.  A median was installed in 1958 between Braden Road and PA 251.  The following year medians were installed between Star Junction and north of Uniontown at the US 119 interchange.

A median was installed in 1960 between PA 201 and PA 48.  In 1961, construction started on a new alignment from I-70 to PA 201, and opened the following year.  A median was installed in 1962 from I-70 to Wickhaven.  In 1967, the rest from Wickhaven to PA 201 was done.

In 1976, the route was changed to its current alignment between Stoops Ferry and Monaca.  Previous to that, it turned onto Narrows Run Road, then Brodhead Road to PA 18 and back to its current alignment in Monaca.

Deterioration was beginning to cause issues for the Elizabeth Bridge in 1982.  In February of that year, PennDOT closed one of the southbound lanes and then two months later, implemented a five-ton weight limit.  PennDOT District 11 bridge engineer, W. G. "Jerry" Johnson, warned that the deterioration could easily spread to the northbound side if repairs were not made quickly.  Conn Construction Company of New Castle won the job with a bid of $53,900.  The problem happened when the cap of a concrete land pier on the West Elizabeth side began to crack and crumble, which caused the bridge to drop 1.5 inches.  Work to repair the pier cap, replace the expansion bearings, and fix the expansion dam began in July 1982 and finished later that year.  Three years later, it would undergo a full rehabilitation.

Tragedy struck on February 16, 1983 when a rockslide took place at 1:45 PM affecting the northbound lanes between Woodruff Street and Crane Avenue.  It happened 10 minutes after workers had set off 17 small ammonia nitrate charges to clear rocks off the slopes along the northbound side.  Ram Construction Company of Canonsburg had a contract with the City of Pittsburgh to perform the work but sub-contracting the blasting to Controlled Blasting, Inc. of Zelienople.  The city hired them after falling rock closed the right northbound lane in April 1982.  Workers had stopped traffic on either side of the slope when the blasting occurred at 1:33 PM; however, they let traffic through when it appeared that no additional rocks were falling.  The blasting may have loosened mud behind a boulder just enough to make it fall to the roadway below.  Norman Flint, a University of Pittsburgh professor in Geology, speculated that ice could have formed in cracks in the sandstone and the warm weather that day, caused it to melt which loosened more rock.  "This is just what the project was supposed to prevent," said Louis Gaetano, Pittsburgh's Public Works Director.

In all, an estimated 500 tones of sandstone, landed first on top of the bulldozer being operated by Andrew Burgan of Finleyville.  He had managed to leap off of it when workers on the ledge shouted a warning, but the boulder landed on him after crushing the bulldozer, killing Burgan instantly on his 36th wedding anniversary.  The boulder also crushed a white Ford Pinto being driven Ronald Miller, who had just gotten married, purchased a house, and whose wife was expecting a baby at the end of April that year.  "I'm angry," said Mrs. Carla Miller.  "It's just so unfair."  The boulder also crushed the passenger-side of the cab of a Kroger tractor-trailer, throwing the driver, Robert Hilditch of North Royalton, Ohio.  Motorists ran to his aid after he landed on the pavement.  "It was just like something you see in the movies," said Gary Namiotka of the Southside, who was sitting in his car waiting to go past the slope when the landslide occurred.  Saw Mill Run Boulevard remained closed until the following afternoon.

Unrelated to the accident, Ram Construction had been beset by financial difficulties including nearly losing its insurance coverage in January 1983 for failure to pay its premiums.  It did file for bankruptcy protection on January 21, and would have lost it's insurance four days later.  US Bankruptcy Judge Joseph L. Cosetti fortunately ordered the coverage reinstated and instructed Ram to pay the premiums.  He modified that order on February 5 at the request of the insurance company for coverage to end at 11:59 PM on February 24.

In 1997, construction began on the interchange at the southern portal of the Liberty Tunnel, and opened to traffic on November 20, 1999.

Those who drive PA 51 knew all too well that the intersection at PA 88 and Maytide Street in Pittsburgh could be a nasty bottleneck.  Ideas for improving the intersection first came to light in March 1992 and right-of-way acquisition began in 1998.  However, PennDOT District 11 determined that the high cost of the project combined with the minimal congestion that it would alleviate did not warrant funding, prompting five alternatives to be studied between 2002 and 2004.  Costs for the alternatives ranged from $45 to $84 million, and again, the project was put on hold due to lack of funds.  The design was modified again and presented at a public meeting on October 4, 2010, with final design, utility coordination, and right-of-way acquisition begun shortly after.  The $19 million project began in August 2013 and will include replacement of five bridges, construction of a new bridge, upgrading signals, lighting, and sidewalks, installation of traffic cameras, as well as improving drainage and stream bank restoration.  Two jughandles were built:  one for northbound traffic to turn left onto PA 88 and Glenbury Street to eliminate the logjam of left-turning vehicles and a second for southbound traffic wanting to turn left at Ivyglen Street.  The projected completion is the end of 2016.

A $31.3 million rehabilitation project began in October 2017 on the Elizabeth Bridge.  Improvements planned were replacement of the concrete deck and barriers, steel repairs, expansion dam replacement, bearings repairs, concrete substructure repairs, full painting, and drainage upgrades.  The bridge had to be closed temporarily on the night of September 26, 2019.  That afternoon, crews shifted the weight of the deck from the cables that regularly hold it in place to temporary metal brackets.  In doing so, a two-foot section of a bracket buckled.  Crews managed to shift the weight back to the cables that were scheduled to be replaced, and while conducting an emergency inspection Thursday evening, it was determined to close the bridge to traffic.  PennDOT, the contractor Swank Construction, and consulting engineers worked around-the-clock to design and install a secondary system which provided a redundant safety measure.  The bridge was originally closed indefinitely, but after the repairs were made, it was reopened to traffic again on the evening of September 27.

Links: Route 51 Expressway (Cancelled)
Saw Mill Run Expressway (Cancelled)
Elizabeth Bridge - Bruce Cridlebaugh
PA 51 - Adam Prince
PA 51 Junction List - Tim Reichard
PA 51 Pictures - Steve Alpert
Saw Mill Run Boulevard - Adam Prince
Saw Mill Run Road - State Route 51 - Brookline Connection

Alternate
PA 51
Southern Terminus: PA 51 at Morgantown Road in Uniontown
Northern Terminus: PA 51 at Pittsburgh Street in Uniontown
Length: 1/2 mile
Names: Fayette Street and North Mount Vernon Avenue
County: Fayette
Expressway: None
Former Designations: None
Decommissioned: 1955
Replaced By: None
History: Signed in 1950.

Truck
PA 51
Southern Terminus: PA 51 at SR 2001 in Elizabeth
Northern Terminus: PA 51 at PA 837 in West Elizabeth
Length: 1/2 mile
National Highway System: Entire length
Name: Hayden Boulevard
SR Designations: 0051:  Elizabeth to PA 51 north
8073:  PA 51 north to PA 51 south
County: Allegheny
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Route: PA 51:  Elizabeth to PA 51 north
Former Designations: None
History: Signed in 1970 as a southbound only truck route.
Links: Truck PA 51 Junction List - Tim Reichard

PA 52 Southern Terminus: Delaware state line two miles south of Mendenhall
Northern Terminus: Business US 322 in West Chester
Length: 12 miles
National Highway System: None
Names: Kennett Pike, Baltimore Pike, Lenape Road, Bradford Avenue, and Price Street 
SR Designations: 0052
0001:  Hamorton to three-tenths of a mile east of Longwood Gardens
County: Chester
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Route: US 1:  Hamorton to three-tenths of a mile east of Longwood Gardens
Former Designations: None
BicyclePA Route L BicyclePA Route: Creek Road to Creek Road South
Pennsylvania Byway Pennsylvania Byway: Delaware state line to West Chester
History: Signed in 1928.

Construction began in 2010 to relocate the route onto a new alignment between US 1 and PA 926 just east of Longwood Gardens.  "Under the project, crews will relocate about 5,000 feet of Route 52 and widen 1,400 feet of 926 and 4,000 feet of Route 1.  We’re going to install traffic signals on Route 52 at 926 and at the new intersection with Route 1," said Pennsylvania Department of Transportation spokesman Charlie Metzger.  The $15.4 million project concluded in October 2011 and consisted of approximately one mile of new roadway, widening and reconstruction of US 1/Baltimore Pike with installation of a new traffic signal, and widening of PA 926/Street Road at the intersection of PA 52 with a new traffic signal replacing the former installation.  Cost for the project were covered largely by federal and state highway funds, but Longwood Gardens also foot the bill for study and design work, as well as the bridge over the pond that empties into Bennetts Run.  Acquiring the right-of-way for the new alignment was a mere exchange of land between PennDOT and the botanical garden.  The main reason for the relocation was that Longwood Gardens wanted to develop the land that the former route passed through and divided, as it formerly traversed what is now Webb Barn Lane and then intersected PA 926 from the southwest.  Also, congestion and numerous accidents occurred at the former intersection just outside the botanical garden.

Links: Brandywine Valley Scenic Byway - Pennsylvania Byways
PA 52 Junction List
- Tim Reichard
SR 0052 LWD Route 52 - Pennoni

PA 53 Southern Terminus: US 219 in Summerhill
Northern Terminus: PA 144 in Moshannon
Length: 80 miles
National Highway System: None
Names: Railroad Street, Portage Street, Cleveland Street, Evergreen Street, Second Street, Gallitzin Road, Main Street, Market Street, Clearview Valley Boulevard, Glendale Valley Road, Main Street, Locust Street, Coalport to Irvona Highway, Rose Street, Dorsey Avenue, Irvona to Glen Hope Highway, Center Street, Main Street, Elizabeth Street, Mill Street, Spring Street, Houtzdale to Osceo Highway, Sarah Street, Stone Street, Walton Street, Phillipsburg Area Highway, Glendale Avenue, Allport to Kylertown Highway, Glendale Valley Road, Kylertown to Drifting Highway, Drifting Highway, Front Street, Presqueisle Street, and Walton Street
SR Designations: 0053
0036:  Ashville
0322:  Phillipsburg
Counties: Cambria, Clearfield, and Centre
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: PA 164:  Portage
PA 36:  Ashville
PA 453:  Madera
US 322:  Phillipsburg
Former Designations: None
BicyclePA Route V BicyclePA Route: Bigler Cutoff Road to Moshannon
History: Signed in 1928.  That same year, the section from Friedens to Stoystown, Parkstown to Clapboard Run Road, current SR 3011 to Handwork Road and Irvona to Glenhope were under construction and completed the following year.  In 1929, the section from Pender Road to Ferndale was under construction and completed the following year.  The section from Ursina to Brook was paved and the section from Oak Ridge Road to Madera was under construction in 1929.  That part was completed the following year when the section from south of Glen Hope to Oak Ridge Road was paved.

In 1930, the route was paved from Stoyestown to Hollsople, Ashville to Frugality, and Brook to now SR 3011 was paved.  In 1931, the route was under construction from Gallitzin to Ashville and completed the following year.  In 1932, the northern terminus was moved from Reedsville to Potters Mills.  Also the section in Kantner was paved as well as from Blough to Landstreet.

In 1967, the northern terminus was moved from US 322 in Potters Mills to its current location.

The southern terminus is moved from the Maryland state line to US 219 in 1970.  Traversed Johnstown on Napoleon Street, Somerset Street, Franklin Street, Main Street and left via Frankstown Road.  Southbound traffic Adams Street, Bedford Street, and Vine Street.

In 2004, the entire route was placed on Center Street in its entirety in Phillipsburg, instead of splitting traffic between it and Front Street.

A new bridge on the route through Irvona was dedicated on July 19, 2012.  The new span, which cost $3.9 million, opened in late 2011 just 70 feet upstream from the original span.  The name of the bridge was chosen to memorialize a local victim from Clearfield County of the September 11 attacks in 2001:  Mary Ellen Tiesi Memorial 9-11 Bridge.  Ms. Tiesi perished in the South Tower of the World Trade Center in New York City.  PennDOT Secretary Barry J. Schoch said, "The tales of heroism from the tragic events that unfolded on that horrific day in 2001 have left their mark on all of us.  Ms. Tiesi is not just a Pennsylvania hero but also a national hero, and by dedicating this bridge in her honor and memory, her name will forever stand as a testament to courage and bravery."  Her uncle worked on the construction of the original span.

Links: PA 53 Junction List - Tim Reichard

PA 54 Western Terminus: US 15 three miles west of Montgomery
Eastern Terminus: US 209 in Nesquehoning
Length: 70 miles
National Highway System: None
Names: Main Street, Second Street, Elysburg Road, Continental Boulevard, Water Street, Market Street, Mount Carmel Avenue, West Street, Fifth Street, State Road, Memorial Drive, Center Street, Locust Avenue, Centre Street, Pine Creek Drive, Mahanoy Avenue, and Lafayette Boulevard
SR Designations: 0054
0044:  Turbotville to three miles east of town
Counties: Lycoming, Northumberland, Montour, Columbia, Schuylkill, and Carbon
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: PA 44:  Turbotville to three miles east of town
PA 901:  Locust Gap to Merrian
PA 61:  Ashland
Former Designations: PA 504 (1928 - 1936):  Susquehanna Trail to Turbotville
PA 891  (1928 - 1946):  Locust Dale to Ashland
PA 45 (1961 - 1966):  Mausdale to Nesquehoning
BicyclePA Route J BicyclePA Route: River Road to Montgomery
BicyclePA Route V BicyclePA Route: Mausdale to Danville
History: Signed in 1928.  That year, the route was under construction from Hillside Road to Washingtonville and completed the following year.  In 1929, the route was built from Bear Gap to Atlas.

In 1930, the route was paved from the Mayberry Township line to the Susquehanna River, Mausdale to Hillside Road, and from Washingtonville to the current PA 44 intersection.  In 1932, the route was paved from Lorson Road to PA 554 and from Elysburg to Atlas.  In 1936, the route was moved off the current PA 44 alignment between Jersey Shore and Turbotville and the western terminus moved to US 15 at the Susquehanna Trail.  Ten years later it was moved beyond that point to its current location near Montgomery.

In 1961, the eastern terminus was moved from Ashland to Mausdale replacing the PA 45 designation and signed on Ashland Road between Mount Carmel and Ashland.  In 1966, the eastern terminus was moved from PA 642 in Mausdale to its current location using the old PA 45 alignment between Mausdale and Mt. Carmel and Ashland and Nesquehoning.

A median was installed in 1971 from Danville to Interstate 80.  In 1992, cracks developed south of Centralia, and eventually the highway was closed.  The road was shut down in early 1994.  In 1999, the route was changed to bypass Centralia after years of the underground mine fire taking its toll on the highway.  The route was changed to follow SR 2035, PA 901, SR 2042, SR 3002, and SR 4028 to rejoin its former route along PA 61.

Links: PA 54 and Centralia - Steve Alpert
PA 54 Junction List
- Tim Reichard
PA 54 Pictures - Steve Alpert

West
PA 55
Western Terminus: Ohio state line in Sharon
Eastern Terminus: PA 5 in Franklin
Length: 39 miles
Names: None
Counties: Mercer and Venango
Expressway: None
Former Designations: None
Decommissioned: 1928
Replaced By: PA 65
History: Signed in 1927.

East
PA 55
Western Terminus: PA 6 in Ridgway
Eastern Terminus: PA 44 in Lebo Red Pin State Forest
Length: 80 miles
Name: Bucktail Trail
Counties: Elk, Cameron, and Clinton
Expressway: None
Former Designations: None
Decommissioned: 1930
Replaced By: US 120:  Ridgway to Hyner
History: Signed in 1927.
Links: US 120 (Decommissioned)

PA 56 Western Terminus: SR 4087 in New Kensington
Eastern Terminus: US 30 one mile west of Wolfsburg
Length: 99 miles
National Highway System: PA 356 North to PA 356 South
Shelocta to Homer City
US 22 to I-99/US 220
Names: Pennsylvania Veterans Memorial Highway
Seventh Street, Stevenson Boulevard, Fifty Six Bypass, Leechburg Road, Custer Avenue, Washington Avenue, Lincoln, Avenue, Sherman Avenue, Farragut Avenue, First Street, Lincoln Street, River Road, Warren Avenue, Astronaut Way, First Street, Ridge Avenue, Indiana Street, Haws Pike, Harold Street, Strayer Avenue, Fairfield Avenue, Broad Street, Roosevelt Boulevard, Johnstown Expressway, Scalp Avenue, and Allegheny Street
SR Designations: 0056
0422:  Shelocta to US 119
0119:  US 422 to Homer City
0219:  Johnstown Expressway to Scalp Avenue
Counties: Westmoreland, Armstrong, Indiana, Cambria, Somerset, and Bedford
Expressway: Business US 422 to US 119 in Indiana
US 422 to Wayne Avenue in Indiana
PA 403 to Scalp Avenue
Multiplexed Routes: PA 366:  New Kensington
PA 356:  Weinels Crossroads
Alternate PA 66:  Vandergrift to North Vandergrift
PA 66:  North Vandergrift to Apollo
PA 156:  Shady Plain to Shelocta
US 422:  Shelocta to US 119
US 119:  US 422 to Homer City
Truck PA 286:  PA 286 to US 119
PA 259:  Brush Valley
PA 711:  Robindale Heights to Seward
PA 403:  Johnstown
US 219:  Johnstown Expressway Exit to the Scalp Avenue Exit
Business US 220:  south of Cessna to US 220/I-99 at Exit 3
Former Designation: US 219  (1938 - 1966):  Napoleon Street to Johns Street 
BicyclePA Route G BicyclePA Route: Business US 220 to SR 4009 
PennDOT
Traffic Cameras:
PA 756
US 219
History: Signed in 1928.  That year, the route was under construction from Armagh to the Cambria County line, Lasky Road to the Bedford County line, and Pleasantville to Egolf Road and completed in 1929.  Also that year, the section from Egolf Road to Spring Meadow was paved.  Also in 1928, the route was paved from Spring Church to Shady Plain.

In 1930, the route was moved from Iron Street, Walnut Street, and Main Street to Front Street, John Street, and Vine Street.  In 1932, the route was paved from Shady Plain to Jacksonville Road.

In 1951, construction began on a new alignment from Shearersburg to PA 356 and opened the following year.  In 1959, the highway was widened and a median installed on it from Leechburg Road to Melwood Road.

Until 1960, the route was came in on Johns Street and Vine Street into Johnstown.  Then the route was on Washington Street, Johns Street, Main Street eastbound, Vine Street to Roosevelt Boulevard westbound, and on Bedford Street.  In 1960, work began on the section from PA 601 to east of Rummel, which opened in 1961 and included widening and dividing from Geistown to PA 601.  Also in 1961, a new alignment from New Kensington to Leechburg Road opened and the designation moved onto it from going through Lower Burrell and Arnold on Locust Street, Freeport Road, and Leechburg Road to the current alignment.

In 1964, the eastern terminus was moved from Cessna to its current location.  In 1965, the route was moved onto the Johnstown Expressway from the Widman Street interchange to US 219 and down that expressway to Scalp Avenue when that section of expressway was completed.

In 1971, a new alignment opened from Vandergrift-Leechburg Road to Vandergrift.  Previously it continued on PA 356 to Labelle Vue Road, Holland Street, Longfellow Street, and Alternate PA 66.  That same year construction was extended from the Bedford Street interchange to Roosevelt Boulevard.  In 1972, the section from the Widman Street interchange to the Bedford Street interchange opened to traffic.  Construction finished on the section of Johnstown Expressway from Somerset Street to Dale in 1973, and with that, the designation was moved onto the new highway and Roosevelt Boulevard.

The Johnstown Expressway became a victim of the 1977 Johnstown Flood, when at 2:00 AM on July 20, runoff from Solomon Run cut the Widman Street exit ramp in half as well as washing out a section of the eastbound lanes just east of that interchange.  Sections of the westbound lanes in Scalp Level were undermined by the floodwater which caused part of the roadway to collapse.

When the final section of the Allegheny Valley Expressway between Exit 13 and Exit 15 opened in 1985, and PA 28 moved onto it from Freeport Road, PA 56's western terminus moved from that intersection across the New Kensington Bridge to the current terminus at Industrial Boulevard.

In 1997, the route changed from the path it took from Shady Plain to Homer City via West Lebanon and Edgewood to the current path.  The new route created several new multiplexes, with the most unusual with PA 156 from South Bend to Shelocta where that highway has its terminus.  The original route is not forgotten as it is named Old Route 56 Highway West in Indiana County where it is SR 3056, and in Armstrong County where it is SR 2056.

With PennDOT restructuring their 12-Year Transportation Program, two projects along PA 56 are now in jeopardy.  The first is the relocation of the alignment near Pleasantville in West St. Clair Township to eliminate the hairpin curve locally referred to as the “Peggy Westover Curve."  The section was studied in 1995 with bid letting in 2007, but now the project has moved into the reevaluate column.  The second project which would involve a realignment of the route in Johnstown's West End has been deferred.

A portion of hillside came crashing down onto the route in Johnstown on June 16, 2015.  "It’s an unfortunate incident, but given the landscape of around our city, is something that we have seen before and probably will see again," Johnstown City Manager Carlos Gunby said.  "But PennDOT and all of its resources are on it.  I’ve talked with them and they are working diligently to get this stretch of 56 open to reduce the impacts of the already highly trafficked and over surged areas due to the ongoing projects we have going on in the city."  The projects he was referring to were the Haynes Street Bridge replacement and Prospect viaduct rehabilitation.  The roadway was closed through June 18 due to clean-up activities and a remediation project began on October 5, 2015.

Links: Exit Guide
PA 56 Pictures
PA 56 Junction List - Tim Reichard
PA 56 Pictures - Steve Alpert

Truck
PA 56
Western Terminus: PA 56 at Seventh Street in New Kensington
Eastern Terminus: PA 56 at PA 366 in New Kensington
Length: 1.86 miles
National Highway System: None
Names: Industrial Boulevard, Second Street, Freeport Street, and Stevenson Boulevard
SR Designations: 4087:  PA 56 to PA 366
0366:  Logan's Ferry Road to PA 56
County: Westmoreland
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Route: PA 366:  Logan's Ferry Road to PA 56
Former Designations: None
Orange Belt Belt System: PA 56 to Logan's Ferry Road
History: Signed in 1980.
Links: Truck PA 56 Junction List - Tim Reichard

PA 57 Western Terminus: PA 8 in Oil City
Eastern Terminus: PA 66 in Fryburg
Length: 14 miles
Names: None
Counties: Venango and Clarion
Expressway: None
Former Designations: None
Decommissioned: 1932
Replaced By: US 62
History: Signed in 1927.

PA 58 Western Terminus: Ohio state line three miles west of Jamestown
Eastern Terminus: PA 68 in Silgo
Length: 72 miles
National Highway System: Greenville to Jamestown
Names: Kingsman Road, Liberty Street, Jamestown Road, College Avenue, Mercer Road, Diamond Street, Pitt Street, Market Street, Wilson Avenue, Grove City Road, Main Street Extension, Main Street, Mercer Street, Mill Street, Main Street, and Foxburg Road
SR Designations: 0058
0322:  Jamestown
0018:  Greenville
0019:  Mercer
Counties: Mercer, Butler, Armstrong, and Clarion
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: US 322:  Jamestown
PA 18:  Greenville
PA 358:  Greenville
US 19:  Mercer
US 62:  Mercer
PA 258:  Mercer
PA 173:  Grove City
PA 208:  Grove City
Former Designations: PA 18 (1927 - 1928):  New Wilmington to Greenville
PA 378 (1936 - 1961):  Saint Petersburg to Callensburg
PA 458  (1930 - 1946):  Ohio state line to Jamestown
PA 338 (1936 - 1967):  Harrisville to Alum Rock
PA 478 (1961 - 1967):  Saint Petersburg to Callensburg
PA 368 (1928 - 1967):  Callensburg to Sligo
History: In 1927, signed from New Wilmington to Greenville on the current PA 18 alignment.  The following year it was moved to the Mercer to Greenville alignment.  In 1946, the western terminus was moved from Jamestown to the Ohio state line.  In 1967, the eastern terminus was moved from PA 8 in Harrisville to its current location.
Links: PA 58 Junction List - Tim Reichard

PA 59 Western Terminus: US 62 in Warren
Eastern Terminus: US 6 in Smethport
Length: 39 miles
National Highway System: None
Names: Kinzua Lane and Main Street
SR Designation: 0059
Counties: Warren and McKean
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: PA 321:  Klondike
Truck PA 770:  Marshburg to Timbuck
Former Designations: None
Pennsylvania Byway Pennsylvania Byway: Forest Road 262 to PA 321
History: Signed in 1928.  In 1930, the route was moved from bypassing Aiken to running through Aiken on the current PA 770 and PA 646 routes.  In 1931, the route was under construction between US 6 and just east of Cornplanter and Marshburg to Custer City.  The following year those sections were finished and the route between them completely paved and the route was straightened east of East Smethport.  In 1935, the section from East Smethport to Open Brook Road was paved.  In 1936, the section from Pump Station Road to Open Brook Road was paved.  In 1938, the section from Open Brook Road to Grimes Road was paved.

In 1941, the eastern terminus was moved from US 6 in Port Allegheny to its current location.  In 1952, the route was changed to its current alignment between Marshburg and Ormsby.  Originally, it used the PA 770 and PA 646 alignment.

In 1964, work a new alignment between Kinzua Heights and Marshburg began due to the creation of the Allegheny Reservoir.  A year later, that section opened to traffic. Prior to that, the route went north from near Kinzua Heights to Cornplanter which is now a branch of the reservoir, then in a southeastern direction to Marshburg over what is PA 321.

Links: Longhouse National Scenic Byway - Pennsylvania Byways
PA 59 Junction List
- Tim Reichard

PA 60 Southern Terminus: US 19/PA 51 in Pittsburgh
Northern Terminus: I-376/US 22/US 30 in Robinson
Length: 9.61 miles
National Highway System:

I-79 to I-376/US 22/US 30

Names: Cross Street, Main Street, Crafton Boulevard, Dinsmore Avenue, Noble Avenue, Steuben Street, Steubenville Pike, South Main Street, Old Steubenville Pike
SR Designation: 0060
County: Allegheny
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: None
Former Designations: PA 1 (1925 - 1930):  US 19/PA 51 to I-376/US 22/US 30
PA 3 (1925 - 1930):  US 19/PA 51 to I-376/ US 22/US 30
US 22 (1926 - 1954):  US 19/PA 51 to I-376/ US 22/US 30
US 30 (1926 - 1954):  US 19/PA 51 to I-376/ US 22/US 30
PA 28 (1928 - 1961):  US 19/PA 51 to Noblestown Road
Blue Belt Belt System: Noble Avenue to Steuben Street
Yellow Belt Belt System: Beaver Grade Road to Campbells Run Road
History: From 1928 to 1930, was the unsigned designation for US 219 from the Maryland state line to US 119.

Signed in 1956.  In 1962, the northern terminus was moved from US 22/US 30 in Robinson to PA 51 in Carnot via the Airport Parkway and University Boulevard.

Conceived in the 1963 Pittsburgh transportation plan, this expressway was built to connect the downtown area to the suburban areas to the west and northwest of the city.  Construction began in 1965 from the West Middlesex interchange to the PA 18 interchange.  The following year construction commenced on the Vanport Bridge over the Ohio River and opened the following year.  In 1968, the first section opened to traffic from the West Middlesex interchange to the PA 18 interchange opened to traffic and received the PA 18 designation, as it created a bypass around West Middlesex.  That same year, construction began on the section from Exit 9 to Exit 12.  In 1969, construction began on the section from Exit 13 to Exit 14 while construction was extended from Flaugherty Run Road to Exit 9.

The 1970s began with construction starting in Lawrence County on the section from the current PA Turnpike 60 interchange to Mitchell Road in 1970.  In 1971, the second section of the expressway opened to traffic from Flaugherty Run Road to Exit 12.  That same year, construction was extended from Exit 14 to a half-way point between the exit and PA 51 and the following year it was extended to near PA 51.  In 1972, the section from Exit 13 to Exit 14 opened to traffic and with that the route was moved from ending at PA 978  to ending at Exit 14.

In 1973, the section from the current interchange of PA Turnpike 60 to US 224 opened to traffic, while construction began on the section from that interchange to north of the town of Pulaski.  Construction was extended to PA 51 from Exit 14 in 1974 and in 1975, construction was extended from north of Pulaski to the West Middlesex interchange.  In 1976, the section from Exit 10 to Exit 29 at PA 51 was completely open to traffic and created what would become the end of PA 60 for almost two decades at PA 51.  In that same year, the section from US 224 to Mitchell Road opened as well.  The following year the expressway would from Mitchell Road to PA 18 and signal the completion of the Beaver Valley Expressway minus the section from PA 51 to US 422.  In 1978, the PA 18 designation was moved back to the original route through West Middlesex.

June 14, 1990 marked the beginning of the end for the "missing-link" between PA 51 and US 422.  Built and maintained by the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission, this section opened from PA 108 to US 422 on November 8, 1991 and the rest of the expressway on November 20, 1992.  That same year, the northern terminus was moved north from I-80 to PA 18, and then seven years later, moved to its final location at Business US 62 in Sharon.

Construction began on the newest part of PA 60, the Southern Expressway, in 1990 to serve the new Midfield Terminal of Pittsburgh International Airport.  This 7.5 mile, $190 million section opened to traffic in September 1992.

On October 17, 2005, US Senator Rick Santorum and US Representative Melissa Hart made an announcement at Pittsburgh International Airport that had been years in coming.  On November 6, 2009, the Interstate 376 designation officially replaced PA 60 from US 22/US 30 to PA 18. 

Links: Future Interstate 376 Corridor Map
PA 60 Junction List - Tim Reichard
PA 60 Pictures - Steve Alpert
PA 60 Pictures - Andy Field/Alex Nitzman

Business
PA 60
Southern Terminus: PA 60 at Exit 3 in Robinson
Northern Terminus: PA 60 at Exit 8 in Moon
Length: 6.88 miles
National Highway
System:
Entire length
Names: Airport Parkway, 99th Infantry Division Memorial Highway, and Beaver Valley Expressway
SR Designation: 3160
County: Allegheny
Expressway: PA 60 to University Boulevard
International Drive to PA 60
Former Designations: PA 60 (1961 - 1992):  PA 60 to University Boulevard
PA 60 (1972 - 1992):  University Boulevard to PA 60
Decommissioned: 2009
Replaced By: Interstate Business Loop 376
History: Signed in 1992 when the Southern Expressway was completed.  Construction on a new $42 million interchange to facilitate traffic into and out of the cargo areas began in 2001 and was completed in 2003.

The route was decommissioned when PA 60 was decommissioned north of the US 22/US 30 cloverleaf and replaced by Interstate 376.

Links: Business PA 60 Interchange Browser - Tim Reichard
Business PA 60 Junction List - Tim Reichard

PA 61 Southern Terminus: Business US 222 in Reading
Northern Terminus: US 11/US 15 in Shamokin Dam
Length: 76 miles
National Highway System: Entire length
Names: Centre Avenue, Fourth Street, Pottsville Pike, Shoemaker Avenue, Front Street, Chestnut Street, Sunbury Street, Sixth Street, State Street, Market Street, Center Street, Center Avenue, Claude Lord Boulevard, Saint Clair Bypass, Lehigh Avenue, Oak Street, Broad Street, and Hoffman Boulevard
SR Designations: 0061
0054:  Ashland
2002:  Brynsville
0147:  Sunbury
Counties: Berks, Schuylkill, Columbia, Northumberland, and Snyder
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: PA 895:  Molino to Deer Lake
PA 443:  Bohrmans Mill to Schuylkill Haven
PA 54:  Ashland
PA 147:  Sunbury
Former Designations: PA 42 (1927 - 1928):  Reading to Pottsville
PA 33 (1927 - 1928):  Bacon Street to Pottsville
US 120 (1926 - 1935)
US 122 (1935 - 1963)
History: From 1927 to 1928, PA 61 was signed from Conneaut Lake to Meadville in Crawford County and from Monongahela to Greensburg in Washington and Westmoreland Counties.

Signed from 1928 to 1936 from Concordville to Chester on Concord Road, Chelsea Road, and Chinchester Avenue in Delaware County.

Signed in 1963 on its current alignment.  In 1983, the route suffered severe subsidence damage in the form of cracks from the Centralia mine fire south of the borough.  The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources paid $500,000 to stabilize the roadway.  In 1987, the Saint Clair bypass was completed and moved traffic out of the borough.

Until 1991, the northern terminus was located at PA 147 in Sunbury.  It was moved to its current location after the new Veterans Memorial Bridge was completed.

In 1992, it was determined that the roadway south of Centralia was beyond repair, and eventually the highway was closed in early 1994.  The PA 61 designation was detoured on the current PA 54 alignment between Ashland and Mount Carmel.  In 1999, the adjacent Byrnesville Road, which carries the SR 2002 designation, was upgraded and now bypasses a section damaged by the underground mine fire that has been burning in Centralia since 1962.

Mine subsidence caused not by fire, but water, caused issues on a section of the roadway in Northumberland in April 2012.  On the afternoon of April 11, a 12-foot-long, 12-foot wide, and five-foot-deep hole opened up in the middle of the road, taking up one and a half lanes and forcing traffic onto the shoulder.  PennDOT crews were on scene all day dumping rocks into the large hole, and then it was covered with concrete and the roadway opened late in the day on April 13.

When body parts are found along highways, it is always a morbid discovery, but that is what crews widening the alignment near Schuylkill Haven in Schuylkill County discovered in August 2015.  On August 13, workers returned to the work zone to discover heavy rains had washed away dirt from an embankment that was being excavated, exposing bone fragments and coffin nails.  The area quickly turned into a crime scene, with cadaver dogs marking other places where remains might possibly be buried.  It was determined that the bodies were not there due to foul play, but the Spanish flu.  "Our working diagnosis is that it was related to the mass epidemic of 1918," said the Schuylkill County coroner, Dr. David Moylan III.  Historical records showed the land had been a cemetery for the old Schuylkill County Poor House.

Experts from Mercyhurst University in Erie collected remains including a leg, ribs, skull fragments and piece of jawbone to be sent back there for analysis.  "Even if we got DNA from these bones, it would be difficult to match them up to people unless we had a cemetery record to compare them or if there were any living relatives that could help us," Dr. Alexandra Klales, post doctoral fellow and adjunct faculty at the university, said.  Experts from Indiana University of Pennsylvania used ground-penetrating radar and discovered mounds that might have been mass graves, along with many individual graves.

PennDOT halted project until it was determined if there were more bodies in the work area.  After consulting with Doctor Moylan, the Federal Highway Administration, and the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, as well as soliciting public input, it was determined that the widening project would continue without further disturbing the property.  "The human remains … will remain in place and PennDOT will take measures to ensure the [widening project] results in no further impacts to the human remains," the agency said in a statement released on October 6, 2015.

Links: Centralia Mine Fire
US 120 (Decommissioned)

US 122 (Decommissioned)
Abandoned PA 61 - Andy Field/Alex Nitzman
Abandoned PA 61; Centralia - Adam Prince
PA 61 Junction List - Tim Reichard
PA 61 Pictures - Steve Alpert
PA 61 Pictures - Andy Field/Alex Nitzman

South
Truck
PA 61
Southern Terminus: PA 61 at Market Street in Sunbury
Northern Terminus: PA 61/PA 147at South Front Street in Sunbury
Length: 1.10 miles
National Highway System: None
Name: Chestnut Street and Wolverton Street
SR Designations: None
County: Northumberland
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: None
Former Designations: None
History: Signed in 1970.
Links: Truck PA 61 Junction List - Tim Reichard

North
Truck
PA 61

Southern Terminus: PA 61 at Market Street in Sunbury
Northern Terminus: PA 61 at Market Street in Sunbury
Length: 0.60 mile
National Highway System: None
Names: North Fifth Street, Arch Street, and North Front Street
SR Designation: 0147:  Arch Street to Market Street
County: Northumberland
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: PA 147:  Arch Street to Market Street in Sunbury
Former Designations: None
History: Signed in 1970.
Links: Truck PA 61 Junction List - Timothy Reichard

PA 62 Southern Terminus: Delaware state line south of Chadds Ford
Northern Terminus: US 309 in Pleasant Corners
Length: 67 miles
Names: None
Counties: Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, Berks, and Lehigh
Expressway: None
Former Designations: None
Decommissioned: 1932
Replaced By: PA 100
History: Signed in 1927.  There was also a section of PA 62 from Wilkes-Barre to Tunkhannock from 1927 to 1928, and it was decommissioned in 1928.

In 1930, the route was paved from Trexlertown to Fogelsville and Claussville to Holbens Valley Road.  SR 0062 is currently assigned to US 62.


PA 63 Western Terminus: PA 29 in Green Lane
Eastern Terminus: I-95 at Exit 35 in Philadelphia
Length: 37 miles
National Highway System: Maple Glen to I-95
Names: Main Street, Sumneytown Pike, Forty Foot Road, Welsh Road, Moreland Road, Edgehill Road, Old Welsh Road, Philmont Avenue, Red Lion Road, Veteran's Memorial Road, and Woodhaven Road
SR Designations: 0063
0001:  Red Lion Road to Veteran's Memorial Road/Woodhaven Road
Counties: Montgomery and Philadelphia
Expressway: US 1 to I-95
Multiplexed Routes: US 1:  Red Lion Road to Veteran's Memorial Road/Woodhaven Road
Former Designations: None
BicyclePA Route S BicyclePA Route: Evans Road to PA 309
PennDOT
Traffic Camera:
Millbrook Road (Westbound)
History: Signed in 1928.  In 1936, the alignment was moved off Edge Hill Road and Terwood Road to the current alignment between the two.  In 1967, the eastern terminus was moved from US 1 at Philmont Road to its current location.  In 1987, a couple hundred feet west and east of PA 232 was widened and a median installed on it in Bethayres.
Links: Exit Guide
PA 63 Pictures
Woodhaven Road
Woodhaven Road Project - PennDOT
PA 63 Junction List - Tim Reichard
PA 63 Pictures - Steve Alpert
PA 63 Pictures - Andy Field/Alex Nitzman
Woodhaven Road - Steve Anderson

PA 64 Southern Terminus: PA 26 three miles south of Zion
Northern Terminus: PA 150 in Mill Hall
Length: 15 miles
National Highway System: None
Names: Nittany Valley Drive and Water Street 
SR Designation: 0064
Counties: Centre and Clinton
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: None
Former Designations: PA 44  (1927 - 1928):  Zion to Mill Hall
US 220  (1926 - 1946):  Zion to Mill Hall
PA 120  (1970 - 1978):  Cedar Springs to Mill Hall
BicyclePA Route G BicyclePA Route: PA 445 to PA 150
BicyclePA Route V BicyclePA Route: Zion to Nittany
History: Signed in 1927, the route was signed on the current and former US 220 alignments from the Maryland state line to Wingate, and then south to Bellefonte.  Signed in 1928 on the current alignment.  In 1929, the route was under construction from Laurel Run Road to Lusk Run Road and completed the following year.

In 1934, the section from Beech Creek to Lusk Run Road was under construction and opened the following year.  In 1935, the route was moved to Lusk Run Road.

In 1946, the route was placed on its current alignment between Zion and Mill Hall.  Previous to this, it ran between Milesburg and Mill Hall on what became US 220.

Southern terminus moved from Dale Summit to Zion in 1973.  The northern terminus was moved from Cedar Springs to Mill Hall in 1978.

Links: PA 64 Junction List - Tim Reichard

PA 65 Southern Terminus: I-279/Truck US 19 at Exit 1C in Pittsburgh
Northern Terminus: PA 108/PA 168 in New Castle
Length: 50 miles
National Highway System: I-279/Truck US 19 to Rochester
Names: 65th Infantry Division Memorial Highway
Ohio River Boulevard, Second Street, Fifth Avenue, Mercer Avenue, Mercer Road, Fountain Avenue, Line Avenue, Woodside Avenue, Ellwood Avenue, and East Washington Street
SR Designations: 0065
0019:  West End Bridge to Marshall Avenue
0051:  East Rochester to Rochester
0018:  Rochester
Counties: Allegheny, Beaver, and Lawrence
Expressway: I-279/Truck US 19 to US 19
Multiplexed Routes: US 19:  West End Bridge to Marshall Avenue
PA 51:  East Rochester to Rochester
PA 18:  Rochester
PA 288:  Frisco to Ellwood City
Former Designations: PA 857  (1928 - 1935):  Pittsburgh to Rochester
PA 388 (1928 - 1936):  Rochester to New Castle
PA 88 (1935 - 1961):  Pittsburgh to Rochester
PA 88  (1936 - 1961):  Rochester to New Castle
BicyclePA Route A BicyclePA Route: Rochester to New Brighton
PA 351 to PA 488
Washington's Trail Washington's Trail: I-279 to SR 2008
History: From 1928 to 1932, the designation was applied to the current US 62 alignment between Ohio and Oil City.  In 1928, the route was under construction from Valley Road to Mercer, and completed the following year.

Signed in its current location in 1961.  The route was widened and a median installed in 1965 between Rochester and Freedom.

Construction would being on the next section of Ohio River Boulevard from near the California Avenue/Marshall Avenue intersection to Pennsylvania Avenue in January 1970.  In 1973, this $16 million section opened to traffic with plans to continue the expressway to the Fort Duquesne Bridge.

With traffic increasing on the North Shore, construction on the $8 million Phase One project to connect the two sections of Ohio River Boulevard together began in Spring 1987 from Allegheny Avenue to Western Avenue.  Phase Two of the project began in January 1988, which consisted of a new interchange between the expressway and the West End Bridge.  The bridge would be closed for two years while it underwent rehabilitation and new ramps were built at the northern end for the interchange.

In 1992, the southern terminus was moved from Western Avenue to I-279 when the missing-link in Ohio River Boulevard was finally closed.

If you were a daily commuter who used Ohio River Boulevard in the later half of the first decade of the 21st Century, you have my sympathy.  Due to construction of a Super Walmart on a hillside where Dixmont State Hospital once stood overlooking PA 65 in Kilbuck Township, landslides started to become a common occurrence.  The first landslide happened on April 27, 2006 after blasting loosened the soil and caused a road closure for two days, but then another happened on September 19 where an estimated 300,000 to 500,000 cubic yards of earth buried the roadway and adjacent Norfolk Southern Railroad tracks.  That last one prompted the Department of Environmental Protection to force Senex Explosives to submit blasting plans before blasting; however, two of the four lanes of the roadway would remain closed for another three years.  Repair work began on June 8, 2009 but had to be halted due to discovery of a damaged footer that supported the median barrier.  Upon PennDOT's review of the plans and approval, work resumed in July with the southbound lanes reopening on August 3, 2009 and the northbound lanes later in that same month.  Due to the unstable nature of the hillside, Walmart withdrew plans for their store in 2007 but assumed responsibility for ongoing maintenance of the site.

In February 2007, the northern terminus was moved from Business US 422 to PA 108/PA 168 at Croton Avenue in New Castle.

A $9.4 million reconstruction project at the Ohio River Boulevard/Marshall Avenue interchange in Pittsburgh began on July 22, 2010.  Phase I included redecking of the ramp from the northbound direction of the expressway and Chateau Street to Marshall Avenue which was completed in November 2010.  Phase II began on July 15, 2011 with the closure of the bridges carrying Ohio River Boulevard over the Marshall Avenue interchange for rehabilitation, and the $20 million phase was completed in November 2011.  Phase III began on January 21, 2013 and included rehabilitating two structures over the Norfolk Southern Railroad line.  The $14.2 million phase was completed in Fall 2013 and marked the end of work.

Another landslide closed PA 65 just north of Interstate 79 in Glenfield on April 6, 2011.  The southbound lanes were reopened that day after it was determined there was no danger to that side.  Heavy equipment was brought in to remove a large boulder that could have fallen onto the roadway, which caused the northbound side to remain closed until April 11.

Links: Exit Guide
PA 65 Pictures
Ohio River Boulevard
Ohio River Boulevard - Adam Prince
Ohio River Boulevard:  Ghost of Grandeur - Bruce Cridlebaugh
PA 65 Junction List - Tim Reichard

PA 66 Southern Terminus: US 119 in New Stanton
Northern Terminus: US 6 in Kane
Length: 122 miles
National Highway System: US 119 to PA 356
US 422/PA 28 to New Bethlehem
Names: Amos K. Hutchinson Bypass, Freeport Road, Market Street, Wood Street, Cherry Street, James City Hill Road, and Fraley Street
SR Designations: SR 0066
SR 7066:  US 119 to US 22
SR 0056:  Apollo to North Vandergrift
SR 0422:  Kittanning to Manorville
SR 0028:  Manorville to New Bethlehem
SR 0080:  Exit 60 to Exit 64
Counties: Westmoreland, Armstrong, Clarion, Forest, Elk, and McKean
Expressway: US 119 to US 22
US 422 West/PA 28 South to PA 85
Exit 64 to Exit 60 on I-80
Multiplexed Routes: PA 56:  Apollo to North Vandergrift
US 422:  Kittanning to Manorville
PA 28:  Manorville to New Bethlehem
I-80:  Exit 60 to Exit 64
PA 948:  Chaffee to north of Russell City
Former Designation: PA 68  (1928 - 1968):  Clarion Junction to Kane
Washington's Trail Washington's Trail: US 119 to US 30
History: Signed in 1927 originally from the West Virginia state line to the New York state line.  In 1929, the route was paved from US 322 to Arthurs, Lucinda to Griebel Drive, and current SR 4033 to Leaper.  In 1929, the route was under construction from New Bethlehem to Champion Road, and completed the following year along with paving from there to Limestone.  Also in 1929, the route was under construction from Tionesta to US 6, and completed the following year.

In 1930, the section from West Virginia to Greensburg was decommissioned in favor for the new US 119 route.  In 1932, the northern terminus was moved from the New York state line to Frysburg.  In 1935, the northern terminus was moved from Fryburg to Tionesta.

Construction on the US 22/PA 66 cloverleaf finished in 1958.  It was replaced with a Single Point Diamond Interchange (SPDI) in 2000 as part of the US 22 rehabilitation.  In 1959, the route was widened from Greensburg to Clopper Street and a median installed from US 22 to north of Delmont and PA 286 to north of PA 366.  

In 1960, the designation was moved from Courthouse Road to bypass Kittanning on its current alignment.  In 1968, route moved onto I-80 to bypass Clarion and onto its current route between Clarion Junction and Kane.  That same year, PA 66 was routed onto its current alignment from US 322 north to its current terminus.  Previous to that year, it followed the PA 208 alignment from US 322 to PA 36 in Frills Corners, then that route north to Tionesta where it ended at US 62.

The only news to come from the route during the 1980s was when the road was widened and a median installed in 1982 from Ford City to US 422.

Construction began on the Amos K. Hutchinson Bypass in August 1990, with the part from US 119 to US 30 opening on July 13, 1993.  The remaining section to US 22 opened on December 9, 1993 and with that, the new expressway assumed the route of PA 66 and the southern terminus moved from Otterman Street in Greensburg to the cloverleaf interchange at US 119 in New Stanton.

Construction began on March 24, 2000 to finish the Kittanning Bypass from US 422 north of Ford City to northeast of Kittanning which opened to traffic on December 13, 2001.

The section of PA 66 north of Delmont in Westmoreland County was a particularly treacherous one for drivers during the winter due to ice; however, it was not coming from the usual source.  Groundwater runoff from a coal mine or coal seam was coming to the surface, and not only damaging the roadway, but causing slick conditions which resulted in numerous accidents.  The problem was corrected by digging a ditch to divert the water away from the road during a resurfacing project in the summer of 2011.

It wasn't an accident, but rather a lovelorn bull and cow that forced the closure of the intersection with PA 85 in Armstrong County on morning of June 1, 2012.  The couple had traveled more than two miles from Alvin Rosenberger's farm.  State Police tried to corral the bovines to the shoulder with crime scene tape, while rubberneckers snapped pictures with their cell phones.  "In this case, we really had to grab the bull by the horns," said Corporal Christopher Robbins.  The lovers were herded into the farmer's trailer for the ride home thanks to portable fencing and a little help from the county emergency management agency and the State Farm Bureau.  "Cows we can deal with – people – that’s a good way to get arrested," added Corporal Robbins.

PA Turnpike 66

Amos K. Hutchinson Bypass: Tolls are collected on the section from US 119 to US 22 as it is part of the Pennsylvania Turnpike System.
Links: PA Turnpike 66
PA Turnpike 66 Exit Guide
Route 66 Expressway (Cancelled)
PA 66 Interchange Browser - Tim Reichard
PA 66 Junction List - Tim Reichard

Alternate
PA 66
Southern Terminus: US 119/PA 130/PA 819 at East Pittsburgh Street in Greensburg
Northern Terminus: PA 66/PA 130 at Park Street in Greensburg
Length: 0.30 mile
Names: North Maple Avenue and Park Street
County: Westmoreland
Expressway: None
Former Designations: None
Decommissioned: 1980
Replaced By: None
History: Signed in 1927.

Alternate
PA 66
Southern Terminus: PA 66 in Paulton
Northern Terminus: PA 66 in Crooked Creek Lake State Park in Armstrong County
Length: 11 miles
National Highway System: None
Names: Hancock Avenue, Pennsylvania Veterans Memorial Highway, Custer Avenue, Washington Avenue, Lincoln, Avenue, Sherman Avenue, Farragut Avenue, First Street, Dime Road
SR Designations: 4105:  Paulton to Vandergrift
0056:  Vandergrift to North Vandergrift
2066:  North Vandergrift to PA 66
Counties: Westmoreland and Armstrong
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Route: PA 56:  Vandergrift to North Vandergrift
Former Designation: PA 566  (1928 - 1938):  North Vandergrift to PA 66
History: Signed in 1938.
Links: Alternate PA 66 Junction List - Tim Reichard

Business
PA 66
Southern Terminus: US 30 in South Greensburg
Northern Terminus: PA Turnpike 66 at Exit 12 in Delmont
Length: 8 miles
National Highway System: None
Names: South Main Street, North Main Street, and Delmont Road
SR Designations: 0119:   US 30 to PA 130
0066:  PA 130 to PA Turnpike 66
County: Westmoreland
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: US 119:  US 30 to Otterman Street
PA 819:  US 30 to Otterman Street
PA 130 West:  Otterman Street to Clopper Street
Former Designation: PA 66  (1927 - 1993):  Greensburg to Delmont
History: Signed in 1996 along the former route of PA 66 north of Greensburg, and formed a multiplex with US 119 and PA 819 from downtown south to US 30 in South Greensburg.

On May 19, 2003, during a "Click It or Ticket" blitz, a police officer handing out  flyers to drivers on North Main Street near Cabin Hill Drive noticed two men, later determined to be Mexican, sitting up front in the truck were not wearing seat belts. They were told to pull over.  A search of the truck found five other Mexican men lying side by side in the back, concealed by tinted windows. Two women were riding behind the front seats.  None of the occupants spoke English.

Links: Business PA 66 Junction List - Tim Reichard

West
PA 67
Western Terminus: PA 5 in Meadville
Eastern Terminus: PA 8 in Riceville
Length: 22 miles
Names: None
County: Crawford
Expressway: None
Former Designations: None
Decommissioned: 1928
Replaced By: PA 77
History: Signed in 1927.

East
PA 67
Western Terminus: PA 7 in Wyalusing
Eastern Terminus: PA 2 in Milford
Length: 33 miles
Names: None
County: Bradford and Susquehanna
Expressway: None
Former Designations: None
Decommissioned: 1930
Replaced By: US 106
History: Signed in 1927.

PA 68 Western Terminus: Ohio state line one-half mile west of Glasgow
Eastern Terminus: US 322 in Clarion
Length: 79 miles
National Highway System: Ohio state line to PA 51
Names: Midland Road, Midland-Beaver Road, State Street, Third Street, Adams Street, Virginia Avenue, Sunflower Road, Beaver Street, Grandview Avenue, Main Street, Evans City Road, New Castle Road, Cunningham Street, Jefferson Street, Sunflower Road, Water Street, Water Street, Clarion Street, Kellys Way, Third Street, Main Street, Colerain Street, Bald Eagle Street, and Fifth Avenue
SR Designations: 0068
0019:  Zelienople
Counties: Beaver, Butler, Armstrong, and Clarion
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: PA 168:  Midland
PA 51:  Rochester
US 19:  Zelienople
PA 528:  Evans City
PA 356:  Butler
Former Designations: PA 13 (1927 - 1928):  Ohio state line to Beaver
PA 966 (1928 - 1969):  Clarion to Scotch Hill
Washington's Trail Washington's Trail: PA 989 to Harmony
Evans City to George Washington monument 
History: Signed in 1927 from Butler to Clarion.  In 1928 the route was extended westward to its current end at Ohio.  In 1930, the sections from Arthurs to Lucinda, Wolbert Drive to current SR 4033, and from Leeper to Crown were paved.  In 1932, the route was paved between Crown and the Jefferson County line and from Pigeon to James City.

In 1956, eastbound traffic was moved to Cunningham Street and McKean Street in Butler.

In 1962, the northern terminus was moved from Kinzua, which is now under the Allegheny Reservoir near Kinzua Heights, to Kane.  In 1968, the northern terminus was moved from Kane to its current location.

At 10 AM on June 4, 2007, the 122-year-old East Brady Bridge that spanned the Allegheny River between Brady's Bend and East Brady, was demolished by explosives.  It had been replaced by a span 300 feet downstream named the Sergeant Carl F. Curran II Bridge which opened on April 26.  It is named in honor of a native of East Brady who was killed near Fallujah, Iraq in 2004 while serving with the Pennsylvania National Guard.

Links: PA 68 Junction List - Tim Reichard
PA 68 Pictures - Steve Alpert

PA 69 Southern Terminus: US 62 in North Warren.
Northern Terminus: New York state line one mile north of Sugar Grove
Length: 15 miles
National Highway
System:
None
Names: Jackson Run Road, Mechanic Street, Main Street, and Forest Street
SR Designation: 0069
County: Warren
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Route: PA 957:  Sugar Grove
Former Designations: None
History: Signed in 1928.  In 1932, the route was pave between Sugar Grove and the NY state line.
Links: PA 69 Junction List - Tim Reichard

PA 70 Southern Terminus: US 6/US 106 in Carbondale
Northern Terminus: New York state line six miles north of Hallstead
Length: 37 miles
Names: None
Counties: Lackawanna and Susquehanna
Expressway: None
Former Designations: PA 692 (1928 - 1946):  Oakland to Great Bend
PA 602 (1928 - 1946):  Hallstead to the New York state line
Decommissioned: 1961
Replaced By: PA 171
History: Signed in 1928.  In 1929, the route was under construction from Thompson Township line to Lanesboro and completed the following year when the road was paved from Herrick Center to Thompson and Stack Road to the Harmony Township line.

In 1946, the route was moved from Reservoir Street from US 6 to Simpson to Belmont Street.  That year the northern terminus was moved from Susquehanna to the New York state line.

SR 0070 is currently assigned to Interstate 70.


PA 71 Western Terminus: US 40 in Scenery Hill
Eastern Terminus: US 30 in Greensburg
Length: 40 miles
Names: None
Counties: Washington and Westmoreland
Expressway: Multiplexed with I-70S from the Bentleyville exit to the Donora exit.
Former Designation: PA 61 (1927 - 1928):  West Newton to Greensburg
Decommissioned: 1964
Replaced By: PA 917:  US 40 to I-70S
I-70S:  Bentleyville Exit to the Donora Exit
PA 201:  I-70S at the Donora/Monessen interchange to PA 136
PA 136:  PA 201 to Greensburg
History: Signed in 1928.  In 1930, the section from Scenery Hill to Ellsworth was paved.

In 1955, the route was moved onto the new expressway from PA 481 to PA 88, from what is currently SR 2016 and Lincoln Avenue from PA 481 to Charleroi.  In 1960, the eastern terminus was moved from the intersection of West Pittsburgh Street and West Newton Street to US 30.

Links: Interstate 70S

Alternate
PA 71
Western Terminus: PA 71 at the Eighty Four interchange
Eastern Terminus: US 119 in New Stanton
Length: 31 miles
Names: None
County: Washington and Westmoreland
Expressway: Entire length
Former Designation: PA 981  (1958 - 1959):  PA 201 to PA 51
Decommissioned: 1963
Replaced By: I-70
History: The route was under construction from PA 31 to New Station and Zediker Station Road to Bentleyville in 1958.  The PA 31 to New Stanton section opened to traffic in 1959 which was the same year the designation was signed. The expressway opened Zediker Station Road to Bentleyville in 1960.
Links: Interstate 70S

PA 72 Southern Terminus: US 222 in Lancaster
Northern Terminus: PA 443 one mile north of Green Point
Length: 31 miles
National Highway System: US 30 to I-81 at Exit 90
Names: Queen Street, Quentin Road, Fruitville Pike, Keller Avenue, Manheim Pike, Main Street, Lancaster Avenue, Lebanon Road, and Ebenezer Road
SR Designations: 0072
0322:  Cornwall Bypass
Counties: Lancaster and Lebanon
Expressway: Multiplexed with US 322 on the Cornwall Bypass
Multiplexed Routes: PA 772:  Manheim
US 322:  Cornwall Bypass
Former Designation: PA 443 (1928 - 1936):  West Jonestown to Green Point
History: Signed in 1927 from the Maryland state line to Lancaster on the current US 222 alignment and north to Lebanon.  In 1928, the southern terminus was truncated to Lancaster.  In 1929, the route was paved from West Lebanon to Mount Ararat.

In 1932, the route was paved from Jonestown to PA 343.  In 1936, the northern terminus was placed at its current location from Lancaster Street at PA 343 north of Jonestown and the southern terminus placed in Goshen.

Until 1946, there was another PA 72 from US 11 to US 309 on Bridge Street, Carey Avenue, River Street, and South Street in Wilkes-Barre.

In 1958, the route was placed on Queen Street for northbound traffic in Lancaster.  Southbound traffic was moved onto 10th Street in Lebanon and a median was installed from Jonestown to Interstate 78 that year.

In 1965, the southern terminus was moved from Goshen to its current location.

In 1970, replaced PA 934 from PA 443 to Lickdale to end at that route.  Six years later, the route's northern terminus was moved to Lickdale.

In 1991, the section that comprises the Cornwall Bypass was upgraded to expressway standards.  In 1995, the current northern terminus was selected.

A year later, PennDOT studied improving the route between PA 283 and the PA Turnpike.  It concluded that left turn lane/shoulder improvements, widening, and “relief routes” around the boroughs of East Petersburg and Manheim would be needed to keep PA 72 from becoming choked with traffic.  However, there is a snag in the funding for this project.  PennDOT released their revised 12-Year Transportation Program in 2004 and this project was deferred.

Links: PA 72 Junction List - Tim Reichard

PA 73 Western Terminus: PA 61 one mile north of Berkley
Eastern Terminus: New Jersey state line at the Tacony-Palmyra Bridge in Philadelphia
Length: 61 miles
National Highway System: PA 100 to the New Jersey state line.
Names: Lake Shore Drive, Philadelphia Avenue, Main Street, Blandon Road, Memorial Highway, Cottman Avenue, Big Road, Skippack Pike, Bethlehem Pike, Church Road, Washington Lane, Township Line Road, Torresdale Avenue, Princeton Avenue, New State Road, and State Road
SR Designations: 0073
0029:  Zieglerville to Schwenksville
0013:  PA 73 to Princeton Avenue (eastbound)
1010:  US 13 to New State Road (eastbound)
6073:  US 13 to New Jersey state line
Counties: Berks, Montgomery, and Philadelphia
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: PA 662:  Oley
PA 29:  Zieglerville to Schwenksville
Former Designation: PA 383  (1928 - 1964):  PA 61 to Maiden Creek
BicyclePA Route L BicyclePA Route: Pheasant Land Road to Pleasantville
BicyclePA Route S BicyclePA Route: Bethel Hill to Blue Bell
History: In 1927, the route was signed on the current PA 108 alignment from New Castle to Slippery Rock.  The following year that section was decommissioned.

Signed in 1928 on the current alignment, and the route was paved from the New Hanover Township line to Layfield.  In 1929, the route was under construction  from Schwenkville to PA 113 and completed the following year when the route was paved from PA 23 to Knauers.

In 1931, the route was under construction from Boyertown to Gilbertsville and completed the following year.  In 1954, the route was moved to Perkiomen Avenue for eastbound traffic in Reading.

In 1962, the western terminus was moved from PA 23 in Goodville to Mount Penn.  In 1964, the western terminus was moved from US 422 in Mount Penn to its current location.  In 1968, the route was moved from Frankford Avenue, Robins Avenue (eastbound), and Levick Street (westbound) to its current alignment between US 13 and the Tacony-Palmyra Bridge.

Links: E-ZPass - Burlington County Bridge Commission
Tacony-Palmyra Bridge - Burlington County Bridge Commission
PA 73 Junction List
- Tim Reichard
PA 73 Pictures - Steve Alpert
Tacony-Palmyra Bridge - Steve Anderson

PA 74 Southern Terminus: Maryland state line near Delta
Northern Terminus: PA 75 three miles south of Port Royal
Length: 92 miles
National Highway System: Dillsburg
Names: Delta Road, Broadway Street, Main Street, South Queen Street, Carlisle Avenue, Carlisle Road, Baltimore Street, York Road, High Street, College Street, B Street, Waggoners Gap Road, Veterans Way, and Tuscarora Mountain Road
SR Designations: 0074
0015:  Dillsburg
0011:  Carlisle
Counties: York, Cumberland, Perry, and Juniata
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: PA 425:  Airville
PA 462:  York
US 15:  Dillsburg
PA 641:  Carlisle
US 11:  Carlisle
Former Designation: PA 233 (1936 - 1941):  PA 233 to Icklesburg
History: Signed in 1927, the route was signed from York to Carlisle.  From 1928 to 1936, there was another section from Landisburg to Millerstown that was signed but was not joined with the section from Maryland to Carlisle.

In 1930, the route was paved from Ickelsburg to Marshrun and Donnally Mills to Millerstown.  In 1932, the route was paved from Marshrun to Donnally Mills.  In 1938, the section from PA 944 to Lebo opened, while the same time the sections between Lebo and Bridgeport, and PA 274 to PA 894 were paved.

In 1941, the northern terminus was moved from Carlisle to Ickesburg.  In 1947, the section at the Cumberland and Perry County line was paved.

In 1950, the route between Icklesburg and PA 75 was finished.  Paved from Perry County line to PA 75 in 1953.  In 1951, the route was split from Market Street with Philadelphia Street taking northbound traffic with southbound remaining on Market in York.

Northern terminus was moved from PA 17 in Ickesburg to its current location in 1965.  In 1989, a median was installed on the section at the US 30 interchange in York.

The route was closed August 8, 2009 between the Maryland state line and PA 851 due to delivery of a large transformer to the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station in Delta.  Another convoy, this time hauling a used 250-ton generator from Three Mile Island, started its trip on May 3, 2010 crawling from PA 24 in Red Lion onto Maryland. 

Links: PA 74 Junction List - Tim Reichard

PA 75 Southern Terminus: Maryland state line two miles south of Kasiesville
Northern Terminus: US 22/US 322 three miles north of Port Royal
Length: 71.50 miles
National Highway System: None
Names: Fort Loudon Road, Path Valley Road, Main Street, Turbetts Flats Road, Church Hill Road, and Market Street
SR Designations: 0075
0016:  Mercersburg
Counties: Franklin and Juniata
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: PA 16:  Mercersburg
PA 416:  Mercersburg
PA 333:  Port Royal
Former Designations: None
BicyclePA Route S BicyclePA Route: Fort Loudon to Richmond Road
History: From 1927 to 1928, the route was signed on the current PA 28 alignment from Brookville to Brockway.  In 1928 it was signed on the current alignment.

In 1928, the route was under construction from Fort Loudon to Richmond Furnace and completed the following year.

In 1930, the route was paved from Seven Pines to Turbett.  In 1932, the route was paved from Honey Mills to Seven Pines.  In 1936, the section between Blairs Mill and Waterloo was improved.  In that year the southern terminus was moved from Fort Loudon to the Maryland state line.  In 1938, the section from Berry Ridge Road to East Waterford was paved.

In 1940, the section from the Huntingdon County line to Berry Ridge Road was paved.

Links: PA 75 Junction List - Tim Reichard

PA 76 Southern Terminus: Maryland state line near Warfordsburg
Northern Terminus: US 322 in Reedsville
Length: 80 miles
Names: None
Counties: Fulton, Huntington, and Mifflin
Expressway: None
Former Designation: PA 5  (1925 - 1932):  Mill Creek to Reedsville
Decommissioned: 1964
Replaced By: PA 655:  Maryland state to PA 829/Mill Creek to Reedsville
PA 829:  PA 655 to Mill Creek
History: Signed from 1927 to 1928 on the US 119 alignment from Blairsville to DuBois.  Signed in its final location in 1930.

In 1930, the section from Cassville to Calvin was paved.  In 1932, the northern terminus was moved from Mill Creek to Reedsville.  Also that year, the highway was paved form Harrisonville to Waterfall, from Saltillo to Knightsville, and from Morgans Road to Mill Creek.  In 1935, the sections from Tonoloway Creek to Harrisonville and Waterfall to Saltillo were paved.  In 1936, the section from South Gordon Lane to Sam's Road was paved.  In 1938, the sections between Colvalt Road and South Gordon Lane and from PA 376 to Cassville were improved.

In 1940, the section between Fisher Road and Needmore was improved while the section between PA 376 and Cassville was paved.  In 1947, the route was paved from Johnsons Mill Road to Colvalt Road.

SR 0076 is currently assigned to Interstate 76.


PA 77 Western Terminus: PA 27 in Meadville
Eastern Terminus: PA 426 in Corry
Length: 36 miles
National Highway System: None
Names: Hickory Street, Summit Cor Road, Terrace Street, Blooming Valley Road, Water Street, North Street, State Street, Main Street, Spring Street, Union Street, and Church Street
SR Designation: 0077
Counties: Crawford and Erie
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: PA 408:  one-half mile east of New Richmond
PA 89:  Spartansburg
Former Designations: PA 67  (1927 - 1928):  Meadville to Riceville
PA 277 (1928 - 1977):  Spartansburg to Corry
History: Signed in 1928.  That year, the route was under construction from PA 8 to the current PA 89 intersection and completed the following year.

In 1932, the section from PA 277 to Garland was paved.  In 1934, the section from PA 408 to Little Cooley was under construction and opened the following year.  Also the section from Spring Creek to Eldred Hill Road was paved.

In 1936, the section from Downey Ferry Road to Riceville Road was paved and so was the section from Eldred Hill Road to Chapman Road.  In 1938, the section from Chapman Road to Garland was paved.  In 1941, the section in Garland was paved.

In 1961, the western terminus was moved from Park Avenue to its current location.

In 1977, the eastern terminus was changed from PA 27 in Garland to the current location.  Previous to that, the route traveled to Spring Creek and then followed the current PA 426 alignment to Garland.

Links: PA 77 Junction List - Tim Reichard
Terminus of PA 77 - Adam Prince

PA 78 Southern Terminus: PA 8 in Stone House
Northern Terminus: PA 408 one mile east of Lyona
Length: 55 miles
Names: None
Counties: Butler, Mercer, and Crawford
Expressway: None
Former Designation: PA 8  (1926 - 1941):  Stone House to Slippery Rock
Decommissioned: 1961
Replaced By: PA 173:  PA 8 to PA 27
PA 198:  PA 27 to Gilbert Road
History: Signed in 1928.  That year, the route was under construction from the Mercer County line to Cochranton and completed the following year.

In 1930, the route was paved from the Wolf Creek Township line to Sandy Lake and Deckards Run Road to Lake Creek Road.  In 1936, the northern terminus was moved to PA 408 from PA 27. and the southern terminus was moved from Grove City to Slippery Rock.

In 1941, the southern terminus was moved from Slippery Rock to Stone House.  The section from PA 198 to PA 408 was paved in 1946.

SR 0078 is currently assigned to Interstate 78.


PA 79 Western Terminus: US 6/PA 8 near Union City
Eastern Terminus: PA 89 near Concord Corners
Length: 8 miles
Names: Concord Street and Concord Road
County: Erie
Expressway: None
Former Designations: None
Decommissioned: 1961
Replaced By: PA 178
History: Signed in 1928.  In 1930, the eastern terminus was moved from Union City to Spartansburg.  In 1932, the route was paved between Wellsburg and current US 6, and from Mill Village to Vincent Road.  Also from Parker Road to Spartansburg was paved.

Originally, the western terminus was at US 20 in West Springfield and the eastern terminus at US 6 in Elgin.  However, in 1936, the route was truncated to make way for US 6N's new alignment.  And the eastern terminus was cut back from Spartansburg to Concord Corners.

SR 0079 is currently assigned to Interstate 79.


PA 80 Western Terminus: I-70/US 22/US 30 in Pittsburgh
Eastern Terminus: US 219 one mile north of Burnside
Length: 96 miles
Names: None
Counties: Allegheny, Westmoreland, Indiana, and Clearfield
Expressway: Multiplexed with US 22 on the Penn Lincoln Parkway from the Wilkinsburg exit to the Monroeville exit from 1952 to 1961.
Former Designations: None
Decommissioned: 1961
Replaced By: PA 380:  US 22/US 30 to Wilkinsburg
US 22:  Wilkinsburg to PA 286
PA 286:  PA 380 to US 219
History: Signed in 1928.  In 1930, the route was paved from Wiester to Mamont.  In 1932, the section from Sardis to Wiester and from Mamont to Steele Street were paved.  In 1934, the section form Saltsburg to McKeeverville was under construction and opened the following year.

In 1952, the designation was moved off the current PA 380 alignment from PA 286 to Wilkinsburg onto the US 22 alignment and onto the Penn-Lincoln Parkway.  In 1959, the western terminus was moved from the Boulevard of the Allies to the Fort Pitt Bridge.

SR 0080 is currently assigned to Interstate 80.


PA 81 Western Terminus: West Virginia state line near West Alexander
Eastern Terminus: Maryland state line 3 miles east of Addison
Length: 82 miles
Name: National Road
Counties: Washington, Fayette, and Somerset
Expressway: None
Former Designation: PA 11
Decommissioned: 1930
Replaced By: US 40
History: Unsigned state designation applied to US 40 after PA 11 was decommissioned in 1926 to make way for US 11.

SR 0081 is currently assigned to Interstate 81.


PA 82 Southern Terminus: Delaware state line four miles south of Kennett Square
Northern Terminus: PA 23 in Elverson
Length: 31 miles
National Highway System: None
Names: Elverson Road, Creek Road, South Street, Union Street, Unionville Road, Doe Run Road, Strode Avenue, Lincoln Highway, First Avenue, Manor Avenue, Conestoga Road, and South Chestnut Street
SR Designation: 0082
County: Chester
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: PA 842:  Unionville
Business US 30:  Coatesville
Former Designations: None
BicyclePA Route L BicyclePA Route: PA 282 to PA 345
History: Signed in 1928.

It was technically not a continuous route from 1987 until 2008.  On September 8, 1987, a tropical depression unleashed a torrent of rain across eastern Pennsylvania, which caused waterways to overflow.  One of those waterways that flooded was Hay Creek south of Birdsboro.  

That night around 9:30 AM, a Geigertown Fire Company engine happened to be crossing one of the spans when the rushing waters to shift it and caused the roadway to collapse.  The engine then became caught in a crevice between the bridge and roadway.  The three firefighters managed to jump from the cab to safety and were not injured.  James Bitler, one of the volunteer firemen, said they had just reached the other side of the bridge when he heard a crack.  Fortunately, three passenger vehicles and a pick-up truck managed to cross safely ahead of the engine.  The following morning, a 34-ton crane from Morris Kreitz & Sons, Inc. of Wyomissing was brought in to remove the fire truck.

Also on scene on September 9 was Department of Transportation engineer Matthew Mazza, who said it would cost millions to replace four bridges and two abutments, and repair the roadway.  Kenneth Fogle, bridge engineer with PennDOT, said that repairs "will not be done overnight."  He said the first order of business was to find an alternate route for people who travel from south of Birdsboro.

The issue still persisted into the 21st Century, where the price tag to repair PA 82 jumped to $40 million.  Another flood in 2005 washed away two large sections of the roadway, which prompted PennDOT to remove two damaged bridges.  Ron Young of PennDOT District 5 said in 2006 he was not certain it would be reopened.  He said, "We are working on a solution as which way to go. Nothing is definite yet."

The decision was finally made on October 31, 2007 when PennDOT announced it had no plans to reopen the long-closed alignment.  Robeson Township supervisors Chairman Roger K. Feeg said he was glad to hear the news although it did not surprise him.  "I'm glad that this is finally decided because it’s been in limbo so long," he said.  Union Supervisor Barbara M. Cole, said her first choice would have been to reopen the road, but as time went on, it became clear it would stay closed.  "The bottom line is, Penn DOT was not going to reopen state Route 82," Cole said.  "It was an exercise in futility."  PennDOT's statement laid out plans to work with local officials and the Federal Highway Administration to turn over control of the closed section to another entity so it could be turned into a recreation area.  "Hallelujah, that's what I say," said Chip Karasin, president of the Hay Creek Watershed Association.  "It is a de facto park, and if it’s more than a de facto park, that will be great."  However, in order for that to happen, Karasin said a pedestrian bridge would need to be built from the end in Birdsboro across the creek as the only way to cross presently is to wade across.  Feeg said he's supported keeping the road closed because it could lead to making the area safer for recreation.  "Nature has sort of taken it back," he said.  "Nature has a way of doing that."

The route was truncated in Elverson in December 2008.  The remainder of the route between there and  Birdsboro became SR 4082 in Chester County, SR 2082 in Berks County, and PA 345 between it and US 422.

Links: PA 82 Junction List - Tim Reichard

PA 83 Southern Terminus: PA 252 in Wyola
Northern Terminus: US 122 in Connor
Length: 71 miles
Names: None
Counties: Chester, Berks, and Schuylkill 
Expressway: None
Former Designations: None
Decommissioned: 1961
Replaced By: PA 183
History: Signed in 1928.  In Reading it was signed on Schuylkill Avenue, Second Street (southbound), Franklin Street (southbound), and Ninth Street.  Northbound was Ninth Street, Franklin Street, and Fourth Street, and Washington Street.

In 1932, the route was under construction from Rehersburg to US 22 and paved from US 22 to PA 443.  In 1946, a bypass of Rehrersburg opened to the east of town.  In 1960, the route was moved from New Schaefferstown Road and Four Point Road to a more straight route between the two.

SR 0083 is currently assigned to Interstate 83.


PA 84 Southern Terminus: US 220 in Larrys Creek
Northern Terminus: PA 549 one-half mile south of the New York state line
Length: 68 miles
Names: None
Counties: Lycoming and Tioga
Expressway: None
Former Designations: None
Decommissioned: 1961
Replaced By: PA 287:  Larrys Creek to US 15
PA 328:  US 15 to PA 549
History: From 1927 to 1928, it was signed on the current PA 14 alignment from Trout Run to Troy.  Resigned in 1928.  

In 1930, the route was paved from Joe's Run Road to the Cummings Township line and Sweetbriar to Wellsboro.  In 1932, the section from the Mifflin Township line to Sweetbriar.  In 1941, the northern terminus was moved to PA 549 from Tioga.

SR 0084 is currently assigned to Interstate 84.


PA 85 Western Terminus: PA 28/PA 66 in Green Acres
Eastern Terminus: US 119 in Home
Length: 24 miles
National Highway System: None
Names: Plumville Road and Main Street
SR Designation: 0085
Counties: Armstrong and Indiana
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: PA 210:  Beyer to west of Plumville
PA 954:  Beyer to Plumville
Former Designations: None
History: Signed in 1928.

In Spring 1962, ground was broken on a new alignment that would bypass Yatesboro, Rural Valley, Merideth and Nu Mine to the south.  The new alignment opened to traffic in 1964.  The project included reconfiguring the PA 839 intersection to allow the convergence of the old alignment, new alignment as well as PA 839.  Also, the Cowanshannock Creek in Rural Valley had to be rerouted.  After completion, the original route was proposed to become Business PA 85 but that never materialized.

It wasn't an accident, but rather a lovelorn bull and cow that forced the closure of the intersection with PA 28/PA 66 in Armstrong County on morning of June 1, 2012.  The couple had traveled more than two miles from Alvin Rosenberger's farm.  State Police tried to corral the bovines to the shoulder with crime scene tape, while rubberneckers snapped pictures with their cell phones.  "In this case, we really had to grab the bull by the horns," said Corporal Christopher Robbins.  The lovers were herded into the farmer's trailer for the ride home thanks to portable fencing and a little help from the county emergency management agency and the State Farm Bureau.  "Cows we can deal with – people – that’s a good way to get arrested," added Corporal Robbins.

Links: PA 85 Junction List - Tim Reichard

PA 86 Southern Terminus: PA 27 in Meadville
Northern Terminus: US 6/US 19 at PA 408 in Cambridge Springs
Length: 12 miles
National Highway System: None
Name: Main Street
SR Designation: SR 0886
County: Crawford
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: None
Former Designations: None
History: Signed in 1936, which is the same year that a section from Cambridge Springs to US 6N was built.  In 1938, the sections from PA 198 to Cambridge Springs and from PA 99 to the Erie County line was improved.

In 1940, the section from the Crawford County line to US 6N was improved.  In 1947, the section from PA 198 to Cambridge Springs was paved.

In 1951, the section from the Crawford County line to US 6N was paved.  In 1953, the section from Cambridge Springs to the Erie County line was paved.

In 1983, the northern terminus was moved from US 19 four miles north of Waterford via Old State Highway 86 Road, Conneauttee Valley Road, and Sharp Road to its current location.

Even though this is signed as PA 86, it does not have the SR 0086 designation because it was moved to Interstate 86 when it was signed in 1999.

Links: PA 86 Junction List - Tim Reichard

PA 87 Southern Terminus: I-180/US 220 at Exit 21 in Montoursville
Northern Terminus: US 6 in Russell Hill
Length: 70 miles
National Highway System: None
Names: Loyalsock Avenue, Main Street, Carpenter Road, and Carpenter Street
SR Designations: 0087
0220:  Dushore
Counties: Lycoming, Sullivan, and Wyoming
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: PA 154:  Forksville
US 220:  Dushore
Former Designation: PA 115  (1928 - 1936):  Mountoursville to Hillsgrove
History: Signed in 1928.  In 1932, the route was paved from Forksville to Edwards Road, Minner Road to Saxes Road, and from Colley to North Methoopany.  In 1936, the southern terminus was moved from Forksville to Montoursville.  In 1938, the section from just south of Ogdonia to Hillsgrove was improved.  In 1941, the section from just south of Ogdonia to just north of Hillsgrove was paved.

The highway was, for lack of a better term, wrecked in the aftermath of flooding caused by Topical Storm Lee in September 2011.  Due to the raging Loyalsock Creek, the roadway was "shredded" in Lycoming County north of PA 973, making travel impossible and forcing PennDOT to close the route on September 8.  An emergency contract was awarded in October 2011 that encompassed repairing the road, debris and deposition removal, excavation, pipe/culvert cleaning, drainage improvements, guiderail upgrades, and new pavement began in the middle of the month on that 1.2-mile-long section and another 0.4-mile-long section north of Montoursville.  The newly rebuilt sections of PA 87 opened to traffic on December 5.

Links: PA 87 Junction List - Tim Reichard

PA 88 Southern Terminus: US 119 in Point Marion
Northern Terminus: PA 51 in Pittsburgh
Length: 78 miles
National Highway System: Low Hill Road to US 40
Names: Home Street, Main Street, Dilliner Road, Dilliner Point Marion Road, Carmichaels Road, Vine Street, Dry Tavern Road, Dry Tavern Fredtown Road, Millsboro Hill Road, Front Street, Water Street, Low Hill Road, Mon-Fayette Expressway, National Road, Blainsburg Hill Road, 88th Division Memorial Highway, Wood Street, Third Street, Third Street Extension, High Point Drive, Elco Hill Road, Short Street, Chester Avenue, Millsboro Hill Road, Pennsylvania Avenue, First Street, McKean Avenue, Fallowfield Avenue, Lincoln Avenue, Fourth Street, Ridge Road, Union Street, Finleyville Road, Washington Avenue, Sheridan Avenue, and Library Road
SR Designations: 0088
7043:  Low Hill Road to US 40
0040:  PA Turnpike 43 to US 40 east
Counties: Fayette, Greene, Washington, and Allegheny
Expressway: Low Hill Road to US 40 east
Multiplexed Routes: PA Turnpike 43:  Exit 28 to Exit 30
US 40:  PA Turnpike 43 to US 40 east
PA 136:  Monongahela
PA 837:  Monongahela
Former Designations: None
BicyclePA Route S BicyclePA Route: Monongahela to Crookham
Pennsylvania Byway Pennsylvania Byway: PA Turnpike 43 to West Brownsville
Blue Belt Belt System: McNeilly Road to PA 51
Yellow Belt Belt System: Broughton Road to Connor Road
History: In 1927, signed from Monongahela to Erie, with the section north of Pittsburgh, the route followed the current US 19 alignment.  The following year, it was rerouted to follow the current PA 65 alignment from Pittsburgh to the west and the southern terminus was moved to its current location.

On May 13, 1929, Allegheny County Commissioner Joseph G. Armstrong officiated the ceremony which officially kicked off work on Saw Mill Run Boulevard.  Commissioner E. V. Babcock, Pittsburgh Mayor Charlres H. Kline, Council President James F. Malone, Councilman John S. Herron, and Henry Meuschke, a Castle Shannon resident who advocated for the project as far back as 1910, were in attendance for the ground breaking.  The project was funded by the 1928 "City Beautiful" bond issue, which was to finance other roadways such as Ohio River, Allegheny River, and Mosside boulevards.

In 1930, the route was paved from current PA 201 to current PA 136.    

In 1930, the route was paved from West Brownsville to California.  The designation was moved onto Library Road from Bethel Park to PA 51.  The designation had been signed on Baptist Road to end at PA 51 in Brentwood prior to the construction of Saw Mill Run Boulevard.  Also that year, the first section of Saw Mill Run Boulevard opened from Brownsville Road to the Liberty Tunnel.  The most challenging part of construction was the PA 51 intersection where seven individual roads intersected as well as the convergence of Clairton Run Creek and Saw Mill Run.  In 1935, the northern terminus was moved from PA 51 to Rochester and a year later to New Castle.

Construction on the West End Bypass began in October 1949; however, it had its start a decade earlier.  Robert Moses, New York City planner extraordinaire, had been hired by Pittsburgh to untangle traffic as well as he had done in "The Big Apple."  This was one of his ideas and priced at $900,000 which was approved in February 1941.  The onset of World War II delayed the project, and by the time it was revised, the cost had jumped to $3 million.  It took nearly a year to blast and remove one million cubic yards of material needed to clear its right-of-way on the side of Mount Washington.  Outside of that, another challenge Harrison Construction Company faced was building a ramp from Steuben Street.

In 1952, the West End Bypass opened to traffic from the Penn-Lincoln Parkway to PA 837.  The route was widened and a median installed in 1958 between Freedom and Baden, Ambridge to Edgeworth, and Glenfield to Emsworth.  The same work took place a year later between Baden and Ambridge.

The biggest change to the route took place in 1961 when the northern terminus was moved from New Castle to its current location.

In 1975, construction began on the section of expressway from Low Hill Road to US 40.  This section opened in 1977.

In 1983, the designation was moved onto the expressway section from Low Hill Road to US 40, and then multiplexed with US 40 to the exit with its original route.  In 1984, when the newest section of the Mon-Fayette Expressway opened between Exit 32 and Exit 34, the designation was moved onto it from its route hugging the cliff along the Monongahela River.  It was moved back to the original route in 1991.

If you drive though the intersection at PA 51 and Maytide Street can be a nasty bottleneck.  However, PennDOT is exploring making changes at that intersection.  The varying plans call for building an interchange all the way to keeping the at-grade intersection but improving it with jughandles to eliminate left turns.

After nearly 80 years of service, the Point Marion Bridge, or Albert Gallatin Memorial Bridge, that carried PA 88 over the Monongahela River, was deemed unsafe and construction on a replacement began on January 7, 2008.  The new $21 million crossing opened on October 22, 2009, and the original was imploded on November 16, 2009.

A sinkhole caused by mine subsidence led to closure of the route in Allenport on August 6, 2009.  The hole was estimated at 12 feet wide and 20 feet deep and repairs took three weeks to complete.

On May 13, 2011, the route was closed to traffic near Fredericktown due to a rock slide.  It was not just dirt and trees that fell, but large boulders that were far too large to be removed by PennDOT equipment alone.  It took until June 2 for PA 88 for the debris to be removed.

Those who drive PA 88 knew all too well that the intersection at PA 51 and Maytide Street in Pittsburgh could be a nasty bottleneck.  Ideas for improving the intersection first came to light in March 1992 and right-of-way acquisition began in 1998.  However, PennDOT District 11 determined that the high cost of the project combined with the minimal congestion that it would alleviate did not warrant funding, prompting five alternatives to be studied between 2002 and 2004.  Costs for the alternatives ranged from $45 to $84 million, and again, the project was put on hold due to lack of funds.  The design was modified again and presented at a public meeting on October 4, 2010, with final design, utility coordination, and right-of-way acquisition begun shortly after.  The $19 million project began in August 2013 and included replacement of five bridges, construction of a new bridge, upgrading signals, lighting, and sidewalks, installation of traffic cameras, as well as improving drainage and stream bank restoration.  Two jughandles were built to aid PA 51 traffic, one of which for northbound vehicles wanting to turn left onto PA 88 and Glenbury Street.

Links: PA 88 Pictures
South Hills Expressway (Cancelled)
Library Road - State Route 88 - Brookline Connection
PA 88 Junction List - Tim Reichard

Truck
PA 88
Southern Terminus: PA 88 at Malden Road in California
Northern Terminus: PA 88 at Third Street in California
Length: 2.70 miles
National Highway System: None
Names: Malden Road and Third Street
SR Designations: 2073:  PA 88 to Third Street
2083:  Malden Road to PA 88
County: Washington
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: None
Former Designations: None
History: Signed in 1990 when PA Turnpike 43 was completed, to bypass the steep decent into California heading northbound on PA 88.
Links: Truck PA 88 Junction List - Tim Reichard

PA 89 Southern Terminus: PA 8/PA 27 in Titusville
Northern Terminus: PA 5 in Orchard Beach
Length: 50 miles
National Highway System: None
Names: Franklin Street, Union Street, Church Run Street, Beaver Dam Road, Station Road, Lake Road, and Lake Street
SR Designations: 0089
0077:  Spartansburg
0006:  north of Lovell to Elgin
0008:  Wattsburg to Lowville
Counties: Crawford and Erie
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: PA 77:  Spartansburg
US 6:  north of Lovell to Elgin
PA 8:  Wattsburg to Lowville
Former Designation: PA 79 (1928 - 1936):  Spartansburg to Concord Corners
BicyclePA Route Y BicyclePA Route: North of Lovell to Elgin
History: Signed in 1928.  In 1929, the section from Lowville to Green Field was under construction and completed the following year.

In 1932, the section from Concord Corners to Ovid was paved.  In 1936, the section from Beaverdam to Ladd Road was paved.  That year the southern terminus was moved from Elgin to Titusville.

The route was paved from Concord Corners to Darrows Corners in 1938 and so was the section from Ladd Road to Wattsburg. In 1940, The section from the Rome Township line to East Brach of Oil Creek was paved.

In 1941, the section from the East Brach of Oil Creek to PA 77 was paved.  In 1953, the northern terminus was moved to its current location from US 20 in North East.

Links: PA 89 Junction List - Tim Reichard

PA 90 Southern Terminus: US 22 in Easton.
Northern Terminus: New York state line over the Delaware River at Hancock, New York.
Length: 110 miles
Names: None
Counties: Northampton, Monroe, Pike, and Wayne
Expressway: None
Former Designations: None
Decommissioned: 1961
Replaced By: PA 191:  Stockertown to the New York state line
PA 115:  Easton to Stockertown
History: Signed in 1928.  That year, the route was under construction from the Pocono Township line to Henryville and completed the following year.  In 1929, the route was under construction from Hamlin to Ariel and completed the following year when the route was paved from Hollisterville to Hamlin and Ariel to Hoadleys.  Also in 1930, the section from Henryville to the current PA 390 intersection.

In 1932, the route was paved from Stroudsburg to Analomink, Cresco to Haags Mills and Dyberry to Equinunk.  In 1934, the section from just north of Stockport to the New York state line was under construction and opened the following year.  In 1938, the section from Monroe County line to Ledgedale Road was paved, while the section from there to Hamlin was improved.  Also the section from just north of Stockport to town was paved.

In 1940, the section from Ledgedale Road to Hamlin was paved and Hoadleys to Terrace Street in Honesdale was improved.  In 1941, the southern terminus was moved from US 611 in Stroudsburg to US 22 in Easton via the current PA 191 alignment to Stockertown and Sullivan Trail to Easton.  Also the section from Equinunk to Stockport was paved.  In 1946, the section from Hoadleys to Terrace Street in Honesdale was paved

PA 90 was planned to be revived for the Pulaski Expressway in Philadelphia, but it's construction was cancelled.  SR 0090 is currently assigned to Interstate 90.

Links: PA 90 Expressway (Unbuilt) - Steve Anderson

PA 91 Southern Terminus: US 6/US 106 in Honesdale
Northern Terminus: PA 371 in West Damascus
Length: 11 miles
Names: Cliff Street, Carley Brook Road, and Oregon Pike
County: Wayne
Expressway: None
Former Designations: None
Decommissioned: 1946
Replaced By: None
History: Signed in 1936.

PA 92 Southern Terminus: US 11 in West Pittston
Northern Terminus: New York state line four miles north of Oakland
Length: 66 miles
National Highway System: Tunkhannock to Dixon
Names: Exeter Avenue, Sullivan Trail, State Street, Franklin Avenue, Main Street, and River Street
SR Designations: 0092
0006:  Tunkhannock to Dixon
Counties: Luzerne, Wyoming, and Susquehanna
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: US 6:  Tunkhannock to Dixon
PA 171:  Susquehanna to Oakland
Former Designations: None
BicyclePA Route Y BicyclePA Route: Tunkhannock to Dixon
Pennsylvania Byway Pennsylvania Byway: I-81 at Exit 211 to the New York state line
History: Signed in 1928.  In 1930, the route was paved from Tunkhannock to Starkville.  In 1931, the route was under construction from Starkville to Nicholson, and completed the following year.

In 1932, the route was paved from the Luzerne County line to Tunkhannock and from Lenox to Gelatt.  In 1934, the sections from Nicholson to Lenox and Gelatt to Susquehanna were under construction and opened the following year.

In 1940, the section from the Luzerne County line to Bowman Creek was paved.  In 1946, it swapped alignments with PA 309 between West Pittston and Bowman Creek.  Prior to that the route started in Kingston at US 11.

A bridge replacement project in Luzerne County became flooded on July 8, 2019 during a torrential rain storm.  The project site in Exeter, to replace the bridge spanning Hicks Creek, was inundated with water which submerged a mini excavator and Bobcat.

Links: Viaduct Valley Way - Pennsylvania Byways
PA 92 Junction List
- Tim Reichard

PA 93 Western Terminus: PA 487 in Orangeville
Eastern Terminus: US 209 three miles west of Jim Thorpe
Length: 39 miles
National Highway System: Hazleton to I-81 at Exit 145
Names: Hunter Street, Broad Street, Hudson Drive, Berwick Street, Broad Street, Susquehanna Avenue, Berwick-Hazleton Highway Third Street, Market Street, Orange Street, and Berwick Road
SR Designations: 0093
0011:  Briar Creek to Nescopeck
Counties: Carbon, Luzerne, and Columbia
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: PA 924:  Hazleton
US 11:  Briar Creek to Nescopeck
Former Designations: PA 22  (1927 - 1930):  Weiders Crossing to Hazelton
US 309  (1926 - 1954):  Weiders Crossing to Hazelton
PA 29  (1954 - 1966):  Weiders Crossing to Hazelton
PA 29 (1936 - 1966):  PA 239 to US 209
BicyclePA Route V BicyclePA Route: Black Ridge to Airport Road
History: Signed in 1928.  In 1930, the route was paved from Slowick Road to Berwick.  In 1932, the road was paved from Orangeville to Slowick Road.  In 1936, the eastern terminus was moved from Hazleton to the current PA 239.  Then in 1966 it was moved to its current location.  In 1970, the route was widened and a median installed from Interstate 81 to Hazleton.
Links: PA 93 Junction List - Tim Reichard
PA 93 Pictures - Steve Alpert

PA 94 Southern Terminus: Maryland state line in West Manheim
Northern Terminus: PA 34 in Mount Holly Springs
Length: 29 miles
National Highway System: Maryland state line to US 30
Names: Carlisle Pike, Baltimore Pike, Carlisle Street, Main Street, Carlisle Road, and Queen Street
SR Designation: 0094
Counties: York, Adams, and Cumberland
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: None
Former Designations: None
History: Signed in 1928.
Links: PA 94 Junction List - Tim Reichard

PA 95 Western Terminus: PA 53 in Centre Hall
Eastern Terminus: US 15 in Lewisburg
Length: 45 miles
Names: None
Counties: Centre and Union
Expressway: None
Former Designation: PA 889 (1928 - 1946):  Buffalo Creek Road to Lewisburg
Decommissioned: 1961
Replaced By: PA 192
History: Signed in 1928.  In 1932, the route was paved from just west of Livonia to the Union County line.  In 1938, the sections from Ridge Road to Penns Cave, the Centre County line to the West Buffalo Township line, and from Walbash Road to Shinbone Road were paved.

In 1946, the eastern terminus was moved from Buffalo Creek Road at PA 45 east of Mifflinburg to Lewisburg.

SR 0095 is currently assigned to Interstate 95.


PA 96 Southern Terminus: Maryland state line in State Line
Northern Terminus: PA 869 in Weyant
Length: 39 miles
National Highway System: None
Names: Schellsburg Street, Center Street, Main Street, Market Street, and School Street
SR Designations: 0096
0031:  Manns Choice to two miles north
County: Bedford
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Route: PA 31:  Manns Choice to two miles north
Former Designations: None
BicyclePA Route G BicyclePA Route: Maryland state line to Manns Choice
BicyclePA Route S BicyclePA Route: PA 31 to Manns Choice
History: Signed in 1928.  In 1930, the route from Faith Church Road to Hyndman and from Sulphur Springs Road to Manns Choice was paved.  In 1932, the route from Shirey Road to Sulphur Springs Road and from Manns Choice to Pleasantville was paved.

In 1936, the section form Willis Creek to Shirey Road was paved.  In 1938, the section from Hyndman to Willis Creek was paved.  In 1973, the northern terminus was moved from Pleasantville to its current location.

Links: PA 96 Junction List - Tim Reichard

South
PA 97
Southern Terminus: Maryland state line two miles south of Littlestown
Northern Terminus: US 15 two miles southeast of Gettysburg
Length: 12 miles
National Highway System: None
Name: Baltimore Pike
SR Designation: 0097
County: Adams
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: None
Former Designations: US 140 (1928 - 1979)
PA 31 (1927 - 1928)
History: Signed in 1979.
Links: US 140 (Decommissioned)
PA 97 Junction List - Tim Reichard

North
PA 97
Southern Terminus: PA 8 in Union City
Northern Terminus: PA 8 in Erie
Length: 15 miles
National Highway System: None
Names: Waterford Street, Perry Highway, and Old French Road
SR Designations: 0197
0019:  Waterford to three miles north
County: Erie
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Route: US 19:  Waterford to three miles north
Former Designations: PA 5  (1925 - 1930):  Waterford to Erie
PA 7 (1925 - 1930):  Waterford to Erie
US 6 (1926 - 1932):  Waterford to PA 505
PA 505 (1928 - 1932):  PA 505 to Erie
US 6 (1926 - 1936):  Union City to Waterford
US 6N  (1932 - 1936):  Waterford to Erie
US 19  (1932 - 1936):  Waterford to Erie
History: From 1928 to 1936, it followed the current US 19 alignment between Waterford and Kearsarge.

In 1928, the route was under construction from Town Hall Road Kearsarge and completed the following year.  In 1930, the section from Sharp Road to Town Hall Road was paved.  In 1935, the section from Waterford to Sharp Road was paved.

Signed on its current alignment in 1936.

Links: PA 97 Junction List - Tim Reichard

PA 98 Southern Terminus: US 6/US 19/US 322 two miles west of Meadville
Northern Terminus: US 20 in Avonia
Length: 30 miles
National Highway System: I-90 at Exit 16 to US 20
Names: Cussewago Road, Reservoir Road, Church Street, and East Main Street
SR Designation: 0098
Counties: Crawford and Erie
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: None
Former Designation: PA 102  (1941 - 1955):  US 6/US 19/US 322 to PA 102
BicyclePA Route A BicyclePA Route: US 6/US 19/US 322 to PA 832
History: Signed in 1928.  In 1929, the section from Fredericksburg to Rogers Ferry Road under construction and completed the following year.  In 1932, the section from PA 102 to Eureka Corners was paved.  In 1938, the section between US 19 and PA 102 opened.

Until 1955, the southern terminus was in Meadville.  That year it was moved to its current location.

Links: PA 98 Junction List - Tim Reichard

PA 99 Southern Terminus: US 6/US 19 in Cambridge Springs
Northern Terminus: US 19 in Millcreek
Length: 20 miles
National Highway System: None
Names: McClellan Street, Meadville Street, Forest Street, Erie Street, Forest Street, Main Street, Edinboro Road, and Interchange Road
SR Designation: 0699
Counties: Crawford and Erie
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: None
Former Designations: US 19  (1928 - 1932)
PA 5 (1932 - 1936)
History: Signed in 1928 on the current PA 5 and Alternate PA 5 alignment.  In 1931, construction began on the section from Avonia to Asbury Road was under construction and finished the following year.  In 1932, the route was paved from Troupe Road to the NY state line was paved.  In 1934, construction began on the section from the Fairview Township to the current PA 18 intersection, which opened in 1935.

In 1936, it was signed on its current alignment.  In 1952, construction started on a new alignment north of Middleboro and finished in 1953.  In 1962, the northern terminus was moved from US 20 in Erie to its current location, eliminating the multiplex into Erie from Millcreek.  In 1971, the route was widened and a median installed from near Interstate 79 to US 19.

This was the last state route in Pennsylvania to share an SR designation with another route.  The SR 0099 designation is now solely used to designate Interstate 99 when its final section opened between Bald Eagle and State College in 2008.

Links: PA 99 Junction List - Tim Reichard

PA 100 Southern Terminus: US 202 in West Chester
Northern Terminus: PA 309 in Pleasant Corners
Length: 68 miles
National Highway System: Boot Road to US 22
Names: Pottstown Pike, Main Street, Pottstown-Boyerton Bypass, Kings Highway Road, Trexlertown Road, Trexlertown Bypass, East Main Street, and West Main Street
SR Designations: 0100
0001:  Chadds Ford
0052:  Lenape to West Chester
0029:  Hereford to Shimerville
0222: 
Breinigsville to Trexlertown
Counties: Chester, Montgomery, Berks, and Lehigh
Expressway: None
Multiplexed Routes: PA 29:  Hereford to Shimerville
US 222: 
Breinigsville to Trexlertown
Former Designation: PA 62 (1927 - 1932)
BicyclePA Route L BicyclePA Route: Claussville to SR 4019
BicyclePA Route S BicyclePA Route: Pughtown to Bucktown
PennDOT
Traffic Cameras:
Phoenixville Pike (Northbound)
South of Kirkland Avenue (Northbound)
North of Boot Road (Northbound)
North of Pottstown Pike (Southbound)
South of Mountain View Drive (Northbound)
Business US 30 (Northbound)
Sunrise Boulevard (Northbound)
South of Ship Road (Northbound)
Worthington Road (Northbound)
North of PA 113 (Southbound)
I-76/PA Turnpike (Northbound)
History: Signed in 1932.  That year, the route was paved from Foglesville to Claussville and from Holbens Valley Road to Pleasant Corners.

In 1956, the Pottstown bypass opened from south of the city to old US 422.  In 1958, the route was widened and a median installed from Pottstown Pike in West Chester to Exton.  In 1958, the designation was moved back to the old route, and the following year the segment from West High Street to north of the city opened.

In 1964, a median was installed from Pottstown to New Berlinsville, and moved back out of Pottstown.

In 1970, what would become a future part of the route opened to traffic.  That section being the expressway segment from US 202 to Pottstown Pike in West Chester.  In 1971, the route was widened and a median installed from Exton to Lionville.  The following year the same was performed from south of Pottstown to West High Street.

In 1989, the route was widened and a median installed from Lionville to the Pennsylvania Turnpike interchange.

Construction began on Phase One of the Trexlertown Bypass on April 26, 2002 which involved earth moving and placement of more than one million cubic yards of earthen fill at the interchange area near Breinigsville and a replacement wetland area near Trexlertown Road and Spring Creek Road.  The advance contract was necessary to allow the embankments time to settle and compress the clay layers beneath the interchange.  This phase was completed in late 2002 at a cost of $6.8 million.

On April 4, 2003 construction began on Phase Two of the bypass which begins south of Spring Creek Road and ends north of Ruppsville Road.  The new $46.5 million highway opened on September 27, 2005 and the designation removed from Trexlertown Road.

In 2003, the southern terminus was moved from the Delaware state line one-half mile south of Cossart to US 202.  The move came at the request of West Chester residents who complained about the amount of traffic going through the borough.

On June 16, 2005, PennDOT announced work would begin on a $13.6 million project to install ITS equipment on PA 100 in Chester County.  Over the next 15 months, crews installed 33 closed circuit TV cameras, 22 dynamic, and 61 incident detectors along the route as well as US 30 in Chester County and US 202 in Delaware and Chester Counties.  They are connected to the Philadelphia Traffic Management Center in King of Prussia.

A widening and improvement project began June 1, 2014 on 2.5 miles of Pottstown Pike in Chester County.  Aside from expanding the route from two to three lanes in each direction to create a six-lane roadway from US 30 to the Pennsylvania Turnpike, five jug handles will be replaced with turning lanes at certain intersections, installing new traffic signals, replacing the metal median divider with a concrete barrier, modifying the storm water collection system, and adding storm water management facilities.  Sound wall, retaining wall, and sidewalk installation will also be part of the project, as well as constructing a truck weigh station on the northbound side at the current Ship Road jug handle.  Work is expected to finish in February 2016.

Links: PA 100 Expressway (Unbuilt) - Steve Anderson
PA 100 Junction List - Tim Reichard
PA 100 Pictures - Steve Alpert
PA 100 Pictures - Andy Field/Alex Nitzman

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Page updated May 10, 2020.
Content and graphics copyright © Jeffrey J. Kitsko. All rights reserved.
Banner signs courtesy of Richard C. Moeur.
Belt System, Path of Progress, and Washington's Trail shields courtesy of Bruce Cridlebaugh.
Information courtesy of the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Exeter Township, Rand McNally, AAA, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, The Pittsburgh Press, Greensburg Tribune-Review, Harrisburg Patriot-News, I-95 Corridor Coalition, Tim Reichard, Rick Mason of PennDOT District 3-0, Derek Kline, Dave Juliette, WPXI-TV Pittsburgh, York Dispatch, KDKA-TV Pittsburgh, WNEP-TV Scranton, WJAC-TV Johnstown, Brookline Connection, Southern Chester County Weeklies, Reading Eagle, Berk-Mont News, and The Unionville Times.